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Re: My Summer Love Letter to James Bond: A Series of Bond Reviews

For years as a kid TSWLM was my favourite Bond film.
Watched anything to do with it, even got up early Saturday
mornings to watch the Open Univesity's media course as it was
about the making of it.  ajb007/lol

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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Moonraker

I believe there are two factions of Bond fans. Those who like Moonraker, and those who really don't like Moonraker. It seems to be the most polarizing Bond adventure that ever existed. Supporters are generally those who are Moore fans, or folks who enjoy the wacky, or more over the top. They have come to enjoy much of the humour envoked in this new run of Bonds, coupled with the quiet, reserved villains and take-over-the-world schemes. And while Moore was making me believe for a while in The Spy Who Loved Me, it isn't happening here. Moonraker is just awful.

It's not Moore's fault though, he is what he is now, his performance I believe similar to that of his last film. But a lot of what is happening around him just stinks on toast as far I'm concerned. There are moments that I think even he couldn't believe this was really happening.

The film starts actually really well though. This PTS is as visually stunning as ever before as Bond free falls from the airplane after Jaws turns up out of nowhere and ejects him. Queue up the Bond theme, and Bond is in a race to get to a parachute on the back of the guy he just ejected. It's such a cool scene because you feel like you're falling alongside them. I don't know about you, but this PTS really hit the nail on the head of what the sequence was made for, minus Jaws trying to fly like a bird and Jaws in general.

But then things start to get really cartoonish and over the top from there on out. Shirley Bassey's back to perform the Bind song, but quite honestly, the song isn't that good. But maybe my memories of Goldfinger and Diamonds cloud my judgement.

The main plot of the story involves the hijacking of the Moonraker, a shuttle on loan to the British government. Bond travels to the manufacturers home, a man named Hugo Drax, to investigate.

We then are taken by helicopter to Drax's palace. Drax is....very dry. Michael Lonsdale does an all right job, especially for what he was given. Drax is just a boring character in my estimation. I would like to see why he has his deep rooted believes, and basically just a bit of character development. On the whole, I don't like these sorts of villains. The rich types, sort of weak and wimpy physically. They're not my jam. And Drax is no exception.

Bond is taken to meet Dr. Goodhead, (a lady), played by Lois Chiles. Quick question, is Holly Goodhead the worst Bond girl ever? She's definitely right there. Chiles acting is just terrible. Terriawful. Her dialogue is just... Like after Bond goes through the spinny thing, she jogs in, "I don't know what could have happened. Something must have gone wrong with the controls." And Roger is about ready to crawl out of his skin. Cringe-worthy. (The first of a few anyway.) Even later on in Venice Goodhead does something else that just irks me. (Good to see also that Goodhead raided Marilyn  Monroe's wardrobe for this scene.) In the hotel room Bond goes through her gagdetry, and arrives at her flame-throwing fragrance. *Camera shoots to her face* She does this shrug thing with a smirk. Has always bugged me. Or (starting to become a tangent), but even on the gondola, "Hang on James!" Yeah, there are more examples, but yes you get the gist. She can't deliver a line to save her life.

Flip back now to Bond's first rouse, the pilot Corrine. It's you're typical Bond to lady flirting. Although there is this curious question about her list. Bond says something to the effect of, "What about your mother's list?" "I never learned to read." What?! You're an illiterate pilot. How does that even make sense? Obviously the line is mean to be taken seriously, but still you don't really joke about not being able to read, but whatever...

Two action scenes follow which are just so-so. Although the ruthlessness of the beasts ravaging Corrine's body, is the equivalent of Drax flexing his muscles. It's interesting. But, then after a no nonsense approach to that killing, he chooses some extravagant deaths for Bond. I don't really get that aspect. Such as the latest boat chase. Isn't it happenstance that Bond is even on the boat into he first place? So either Drax is very much in touch with Bond's moment to moment activities, or Drax has those people in the boat circle all the time, just in case.

The next part is pure Moore cheese. The boat grows wheels and Bond drives around Venice all causal. This is basically a direct lift from The Spy Who Loved Me as they drive onto the beach. They even have the same guy looking at the wine bottle, blaming the alcohol. If you chuckled at the gag the first time like I might have, you didn't this time, especially with the pigeon doing a double-take. Cringe.

After Bond finds out that things are starting to get a little screwy from Drax's end, with the nerve gas and all, he's meet by buddy in the robes who nearly killed him before. It's a pretty good scrap, but it also seems like obligatory if you're going to have a character falling that you must show what is going on in that setting before said fall occurs. That little cut away just tips you off that it's going to end very soon, and draws you unnecessarily away, from like I mentioned before, a pretty good scrap.

Now here's another little problem I have with Moonraker. The return of Jaws. Maybe not the return, but how they use him here, is not how I would have liked to see him used. In The Spy Who Loved Me you're frightened of him because he's a seven foot psychopath with metal teeth. And they display him in that light. The fight in the train, in Cairo, etc. Here, he's just a punch line. A baffoon basically. The gondola scene is a prime example. Sure he bites the rope in two, (for a character that has metal teeth, perfectly plausible), but then there's this shot of him swinging his way to the nearest gondola, which is a little out there. So then they meet up and are face-to-face. Jaws clears the distance from a standing start, (using the force I presume), and they start to battle. But it's almost when writing the character, the filmmakers want to bake their cake and eat it too. We've gathered that Jaws is strong, but a punch and a kick and he's down. They drop him into the cable car, where he falls like a bag of hammers, and he gets up like nothing happened. And then punches through the ceiling. I can't wrap my head around that one. He can't be not that strong one minute, than devastingly strong the next. Right? (Also, a word about Bond and Goodheads escape. They slide the zip line with the chain. Wouldn't they be sliding down that thing like a bat out of hell? It doesn't seem like they are moving that quick. Am I on to something there, or should I make it relax?) Jaws then, who in turn is moving pretty quick, destroys the gondola place, and is once again unharmed. The music builds up and a french-braided blonde comes to rescue Jaws, and she is just smitten with love. (Who wouldn't be?) And they go on to live happily ever after.

Jaws is next seen in the second boat chase into the picture. The shot they use of him during the chase just again, makes me cringe. (Does he have to wear white shirts?) The rear-screen projection, and the stupid smile. Jaws continues to be awful with the firearms missing Bond on several occasions, before Bond notices the waterfall up ahead. He has a hang glider. Jaws doesn't. Figure it out. Before Jaws falls they quickly zoom in on his face and it is eerily similar to one I once saw Scooby from Scooby Doo use when caught by Old Man Jenkins. It's so ridiculous. But, he survives...

Bond finds Drax's lair, nearly gets killed by a humongous snake, before Jaws once again arrives. We finally get what Drax is really jiving at. But then again, not really. I want to really know why he's decided to kill everyone on earth and start over. He doesn't really explain. I wanted a Hitlerian rant of a raving lunatic, but then again, that's not how they wrote the character, so we don't get that bit.

And then I arrive at the my second main problem with Moonraker. The plot, but mainly the last forty minutes, just seems like a blatant attempt to cash in on the recent success of Star Wars. The laser gun battle sequence. Really?!! Watching it now and I feel like it was a deleted scene from Episode IV. And Jaws turns good too, but considering the film as a whole, ain't that far out there. (It's quote funny how everyone is wearing the yellow jump-suits, but Jaws is still rocking the white shirt with suspenders.) I'm sure Jaws has someone left on Earth he doesn't want to see killed. And he isn't going to survive anyway so... (I always found it funny too how Jaws' lady came along with him, perfectly willing to abandon any life she had before, willing to have her family killed, to go along with charade.)

But I think this was a microcosm of the James Bond films in the 1970s. The films tried to catch up on film trends; Live and Let Die (blaxploitation), The Man With The Golden Gun (the scene at the martial arts camp), and now this one. That's what separates the two decades at this point, 60s Bond were trend-setters, 70s Bond rode the wave of other trends. I know that James Bond hype waned in the later half of the decade and so interest was low, but it's my main reason for liking those 60s adventures more than the ones from the 70s.

Oh and before I start my conclusion. That absolutely killer line by Q when all of Bonds superiors are watching him bed Goodhead makes the film worth watching. "Bond what are you doing?" "I think he's attempting re-entry, sir." (Queue up Daltrey scream from Won't Get Fooled Again.) Killer line. But...we needed another line, because if there was one thing Moonraker needed, was more attempted humour. And that line removed the smirk I had on and put my mouth back into the cringe. Although it is the most convincing bit of dialogue Lois Chiles had uttered in the film.

Moonraker is a beautifully looking film. And you can definitely tell the filmmakers put a lot of money into it. (More than the first six pictures combined or something to that tune.) But it's too self-indulgent and it's like they were given carte-blanche to make any kind of movie they pleased. Which essentially allowed them to justify the amount of cheesiness.  It's not my cup of tea, (at times it's like The Man With the Golden Gun on steroids). So I don't visit this film often and don't plan re-watching it in the immediate future either.

3/10

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ajb007/martini  Another great review. As a kid I loved MR but then I was always a fan of
SiFi.  Older now and it's not so much a favourite.  ajb007/biggrin
Totally agree it looks fantastic ( one of the best looking Bonds)  ajb007/biggrin  loved the
Death of Corrine, very " The Omen"  ajb007/wink .  The never "learned to read", I always assumed
Was a simple throw away line. Lois Chiles is very Wooden  ajb007/crap
   Drax is very under written, we never get the scene when he explains his need
To rebuild the world in his image, his passion for his plan.
  Never thought much of the fight in the glass factory, always found it slow and
Find the gondola boat chase, frankly boring.
I also hate what they did with Jaws, he should have stayed a " Psycho Killer "  ajb007/lol
Although I do love the space special  effects ( done " Old School ")  ajb007/cheers , I remember
Reading Industrial Light & Magic were contacted but wanted a percentage, which
Wasn't going to happen.  ajb007/lol
Even with it's faults, when I'm in the right mood and it's on TV , I'll happily sit
Down and watch it.  ajb007/lol   ajb007/martini

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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samurai4114 wrote:

Moonraker is just awful


That says it all for me! ajb007/lol

"Felix Leiter, a brother from Langley."

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ajb007/lol  If you had just written that first, boy would that have been  one concise
Review  ajb007/wink

( Although one of the shortest reviews was by  Leonard Maltin on the film
"Isn’t it Romantic" to which he wrote " NO!"  )  ajb007/lol

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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As you can tell, Moonraker doesn't rate highly..., but I'm glad ypu both liked it.  ajb007/lol

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For Your Eyes Only

One of the main reasons this summer I wished to re-watch all of the James Bind adventures, was to see how they fit. How I felt about each particular movie. How they compared to each other. Which films were better than others. I was always curious about how my rankings would look. What would be my top 23. For Your Eyes Only is a perfect example.

I always knew that I liked the film. But I wasn't sure how it stacked up in my eyes to any of the Connery films, or the later ones. So, after not seeing this one for a while, I decided it needed a fresh look from fresh eyes. And I must say, For Your Eyes Only makes a solid case, for the best Moore Bond picture.

After Moonraker, this movie gives you sense that the filmmakers were going to try and go back-to-basics, tone down the humour and large budgets, for a more focused plot with interesting characters. And to its credit, it is the one Moore film with the least amount of forced, screwball comedy, and the most Fleming-esque tone throughout.

With all that being said, they really make you question liking it with some for the things they pull at the beginning. The pre title sequence is probably the weirdest thing in all of Bond. They purposely tried to branch away from Bond's marriage in the past, but here, out of nowhere, Blofeld just shows up. On a rooftop, in the wheelchair, playing with this remote control, which forces the helicopter into contortions he so chooses, Blofeld has Bond essentially trapped. But in typical Blofeld fashion, he squanders another great chance at ousting his arch-enemy. Instead he decides to giggle at every word that dribbles out of his mouth, and doesn't realize that Bond is actually helping his situation a great deal. Bond then takes control of the 'copter, picks up Blofeld by the wheel axis, and drops him down a large chimney. But not before offering Bond "a delicatessen in stainless steel." And as tempted as Bond surely was, he made the right choice. Can we just say that that is the weirdest scene in a Bond film?

Also, the title sequence is just cheesy. The song is just blah, and we can see Sheena Easton. The imagery just makes it feel like a cheap music video. Roger at this point, needed a much more uptempo song, but he'd have to wait for Duran Duran for that.

Call me crazy, but the chase scene that swings the film into gear is one of the best in the series. Bond and Melina meet after she kills her parents assassin, thus allowing Bond to escape. Together they depart in what appears to be a Volkswagen Beetle, and begin a rather thrilling and entertaining chase. It's rather well done, and the scenery looks quite pretty as well. And I've always enjoyed this "Bond, James Bond," introduction more than any of Roger's others.

This scene just begins treating us to a really good first hour of Bond. The snowy, white atmosphere and all of the activities around them gives it almost a Winter Olympics feel that is very neat. But, it's one thing to show the sports, and another to actually encorporate them into the story and the filmmakers did a good job of that. We get to see Bibi (I'll discuss her later...) doing her figure skating, Kriegler performing in the biathlon, and the hockey players starting to rough it up with Bond. (I particularly enjoyed that one.) But the best is the big chase when Kriegler breaks away on his skies, and we get to see Bond try and elude him. It takes you into a luge track, and Bond taking off on the ski-jump. With all these other people doing activities, all seemingly in close proximity, it's almost as if you're in the Olympic village with them.

One of the issues I do take with For Your Eyes Only, is some of the slowness during the second half. In particular, all of the underwater sequences with Havelock's underwater sub, when they try and recover the ATAC. It's a solid ten minute chunk that slows the film down to a crawl, and let's up in a spot that it shouldn't let up at. If that could have been edited down, I would have been thankful.

The other, is the character of Bibi and the weirdness she provides with Bond. At this point, if you haven't noticed Roger Moore's age, then you've been watching the film with both eyes shut. So then we have this encounter where Bibi is naked underneath the blankets and wants Bind to join here. Bond tries to be subtle, "I like you Bibi, but I don't think you're uncle Ari would approve." "Him, he still thinks I'm a virgin." "Yes, well come along, and I'll buy you an ice cream." My question is this, why? Why do they have to make Bond so old, and feel old? It makes it such an awkward viewing experience for everyone. Couldn't they have reworked that scene so some of the weirdness was avoided?

After watching For Your Eyes Only over again, one thing became clear to me as well, Melina is the most underrated Bond girl in the series. Carole Bouquet delivers an excellent performance, conveying the hardship of losing her parents well. I personally just love her eyes, and her long, straight locks. (There's something I quite like about long, black hair...)

Quick. Think of any James Bind villain. I'll give you a second. Got your answer? I assume you didn't think the main villain in this adventure, Aris Kristatos. I'm pretty sure he is the least talked about, and least loved villain in the series. There is a reasonable answer to this by the way, he just isn't at all memorable. There isn't a moment to remember him by. In fact, Locque and Kriegler are much more memorable because of screen time and role in the first part of the film. Except for perhaps that tremendous decision to lift Mr. Big's method for death of Bond and Solitaire in the Live and Let Die, dragging them through the ocean so they are stripped to the bone, Kristatos wasn,t given much to do. (What a great scene that was though.) I just wish there was more to Kristatos.

Columbo, I must say, is probably the most underrated ally in the series as well. He just regales me of those older, foreign allies such as Kerim Bey and Draco from Bonds ago. Plus, he as much interest in catching Kristatos or more than Bond himself. Although, I wish that in the end, Melina got her revenge by her own hand, sort of Domino style, but in any event, the ending was sufficient.

Speaking of the ending, the big exciting climax, is exactly that. The drama as well of Bond scaling the mountain and nearly plunging to his death. To the battle in Kristatos' house, the end really packed a punch, proving that a smaller budget Bind could do it once again.

The Moore-Bond sense of humour that we'd been accustomed to in the past was thankfully toned down and a lot less in your face, than say, Moonraker for instance. Instead, we get some great Moore ruthlessness, (kicking Locque down the mountain,) and some great action scenes. (In fact, upon first viewing this picture, there were times I was dumbfounded by the lack of cheesiness. At certain moments I was sure there was going to the typical stuff, and I almost had to pinch myself when there wasn't.) And when the humour comes, it actually is a little funny. Q fumbling around with the Identigraph, making some mistakes like we're used to seeing whilst watching older folks operating computers and electronics is genuinely funny. Except for the gag at the last minute, with the parrot phoning up Margaret Thatcher, (which isn't that bad actually,) it just doesn't fit the tone of the film and could have easily been left on the cutting room floor. But oh well...

Overall I must say, For Your Eyes Only is certainly a riser on my rankings. But for now it fits very comfortably with the other solid adventures.

7/10

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samurai4114 wrote:

And to its credit, it is the one Moore film with the least amount of forced, screwball comedy, and the most Fleming-esque tone throughout.

And that's precisely why FYEO is my favorite Roger Moore Bond film.

"Felix Leiter, a brother from Langley."

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+1, Mine too  ajb007/martini

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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Re: Moore's age and FYEO

Until this point, Eon had made no issue of Bond's age. Indeed, in MR his character is paper thin and cartoonish in all respects and a decision was definitely made by Broccoli, Wilson, Maibaum and/or Glen to improve the handling of their main character in the next movie.

Part of this involved embracing their star's age rather than ignoring it. He's seen mourning a wife who died more than a decade earlier; he puffs and pants during a chase; he spurns a young would-be lover.
Aging is one of FYEO's themes, not too subtly done in the subtext (and again contrast with MR where subtext and themes are concerned) for the three main male characters- eg, Bibi telling Ari he's too old- and this fits neatly with the revenge plot.

Moore/Bond's age is an integral part of this film, and handled far better here than it would be later when it was more of an issue (cue Duran Duran...).

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Barbel wrote:

Re: Moore's age and FYEO

Until this point, Eon had made no issue of Bond's age. Indeed, in MR his character is paper thin and cartoonish in all respects and a decision was definitely made by Broccoli, Wilson, Maibaum and/or Glen to improve the handling of their main character in the next movie.

Part of this involved embracing their star's age rather than ignoring it. He's seen mourning a wife who died more than a decade earlier; he puffs and pants during a chase; he spurns a young would-be lover.
Aging is one of FYEO's themes, not too subtly done in the subtext (and again contrast with MR where subtext and themes are concerned) for the three main male characters- eg, Bibi telling Ari he's too old- and this fits neatly with the revenge plot.

Moore/Bond's age is an integral part of this film, and handled far better here than it would be later when it was more of an issue (cue Duran Duran...).

Very sensible thoughts, Barbel!  ajb007/cheers
I've never seen it that way and it makes me even more appreciating the movie.
I wished that we'd have seen a bit more from Lisl - imo she had a very good chemistry with Moore.

Bond turning down a bedded chick was totally new back then and it was in the pre AIDS age, so it was a kind of stunner.

Bibi was unfortunately played very dumb - I am sure LHJ could have done it much better.

But 3 beautiful ladies in a Bond movie - and I applaud loudly  ajb007/lol  and FYEO is my second favorite after OHMSS.

BTW the PTS was rather spectacular back then, it lifted the audiences out of their sets! Remember that these have been done for the big screen and not for Betamax or DVD.

President of the 'Misty Eyes Club'.
-------Dalton - the weak and weepy Bond!------
FIRST TO DISCOVER substantial evidence that Chew Mee is in fact not totally nude in the TMWTGG pool scenes!

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Barbel wrote:

He's seen mourning a wife who died more than a decade earlier...

But this was really to introduce a 'new' Bond as Roger wasn't for coming back - well, not until his money went up  ajb007/lol

All your other points are valid and are good 'spots'  ajb007/martini

YNWA: Justice For The 96

The Joy Of 6

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Sir Miles wrote:
Barbel wrote:

He's seen mourning a wife who died more than a decade earlier...

But this was really to introduce a 'new' Bond as Roger wasn't for coming back - well, not until his money went up  ajb007/lol

All your other points are valid and are good 'spots'  ajb007/martini

I've never seen it that way.
To me, it was a message from the producers:

"Ok, in the last adventure, we went a bit "Star Wars" and we are now coming back to the classic Bond with a nod to his past."

And btw. Sir Roger played that scene so well - I am still getting goosebumps when I see it!
Dalton would have ruined it with some unnecessary tears!

President of the 'Misty Eyes Club'.
-------Dalton - the weak and weepy Bond!------
FIRST TO DISCOVER substantial evidence that Chew Mee is in fact not totally nude in the TMWTGG pool scenes!

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Agreed that the grave scene was to set up a new Bond (?James Brolin, Dalton) but it works just fine with Moore.

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Higgins wrote:

But then your father must have been as old as Acacia Avenue - in his 80s  ajb007/biggrin

I've just retrieved a nice analogy and - of course can't resist to throw that insult  ajb007/biggrin

When Acacia Avenue was a teenager they haven't received planning permission to build Stonehenge  ajb007/biggrin  ajb007/biggrin  ajb007/biggrin

President of the 'Misty Eyes Club'.
-------Dalton - the weak and weepy Bond!------
FIRST TO DISCOVER substantial evidence that Chew Mee is in fact not totally nude in the TMWTGG pool scenes!

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Moore's Contract was supposed to end after MR I think, but he stayed on. That's why we see Bonds legs walking through the Graveyard, originally to introduce a new Bond  ajb007/martini

1.On Her Majesties Secret Service 2.The Living Daylights 3.license To Kill 4.The Spy Who Loved Me 5.Goldfinger

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And what legs they were Roger himself posed in a bikini bottom for
That famous poster for FYEO.  ajb007/lol

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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Nice reviews as always, Samurai!  I’ve come to look forward to reading your write-ups of these films.  I’m so glad we still have eleven more after this (twelve if you count that NSNA atrocity). 

MR is my least favorite Bond film, and it’s followed immediately by FYEO, which is my favorite.  Now, I’m not saying that I think FYEO is “the best” – it’s just my personal favorite, the one I could watch again and again and never get bored with.  Something about that film (perhaps the fact that it’s pulled directly from a Fleming story) makes it feel, to me, like the most Fleming-esque film in the entire series.  Something about the scaled-down approach, the plot, the double crossing between Kristatos and Colombo, the revenge subplot, the action, the beautiful locations, the strong and lovely leading lady – it’s all just so very Bond.  It has some flaws, of course – notably the very existence of Bibi Dahl and that bizarre opener (you’re right, Samurai, that this is the strangest scene in any Bond film) – but overall it’s just terrific.  I love For Your Eyes Only, and when I think of James Bond movies, this is the one I think of. 

Moonraker, on the other hand...well, the less said about it, the better.  Let’s just say that it’s an insult to Fleming’s memory and I’m glad he wasn’t alive to see it.

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I love For Your Eyes Only as the best

Not the most coherent, not the most spectacular, and a world away from CR,GF,OHMSS, SF, FRWL etc but somehow the most successful. It gets better with each viewing

I love the plots within plots - they all have motivation to go after Kristatos - Colombo wartime escapades, Brink defecting, Melina her parents murdered. All done within sunny Spain, snowy Italy and the rock formations of the Meteora.

I tend to love Kristatos. You don't need a villain pressing buttons with his henchman.You need a shady crook who has been secretly dealing with the Soviets in the Cold War. He doesn't need to be a showy villain but one who keeps to the shadows. The interaction between him and Colombo is deep and bitter.

You don't need a splashy Blofeld villain. You need a hidden crook

Plus I love Julian Glover, one of the best British stage actors

1. For Your Eyes Only      2. The Living Daylights    3 From Russia with Love  4. Casino Royale  5. OHMSS  6. Skyfall

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A great review, as always! However, it is not a Volkswagen Beetle but a Citroen 2CV; the greatest car ever made ajb007/lol

1. Ohmss   2. Frwl   3. Op   4. Tswlm   5. Tld   6. Ge  7. Yolt 8. Lald   9. Cr   10. Ltk   11. Dn   12. Gf   13. Qos   14. Mr   15. Tmwtgg   16. Fyeo   17. Twine   18. Sf   19. Tb   20 Tnd   21. Spectre   22 Daf   23. Avtak   24. Dad

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Higgins wrote:
Sir Miles wrote:
Barbel wrote:

He's seen mourning a wife who died more than a decade earlier...

But this was really to introduce a 'new' Bond as Roger wasn't for coming back - well, not until his money went up  ajb007/lol

All your other points are valid and are good 'spots'  ajb007/martini

I've never seen it that way.
To me, it was a message from the producers:

"Ok, in the last adventure, we went a bit "Star Wars" and we are now coming back to the classic Bond with a nod to his past."

And btw. Sir Roger played that scene so well - I am still getting goosebumps when I see it!
Dalton would have ruined it with some unnecessary tears!

I'd tend to agree actually on why they decided to show Bond at Tracy's gravestone. I too always assumed they were just bringing the character "down-to-earth" so to speak.

Barbel wrote:

Re: Moore's age and FYEO

Until this point, Eon had made no issue of Bond's age. Indeed, in MR his character is paper thin and cartoonish in all respects and a decision was definitely made by Broccoli, Wilson, Maibaum and/or Glen to improve the handling of their main character in the next movie.

Part of this involved embracing their star's age rather than ignoring it. He's seen mourning a wife who died more than a decade earlier; he puffs and pants during a chase; he spurns a young would-be lover.
Aging is one of FYEO's themes, not too subtly done in the subtext (and again contrast with MR where subtext and themes are concerned) for the three main male characters- eg, Bibi telling Ari he's too old- and this fits neatly with the revenge plot.

Moore/Bond's age is an integral part of this film, and handled far better here than it would be later when it was more of an issue (cue Duran Duran...).

And a question about him turning down a younger woman in this movie. How much older is Melina intended to be than Bibi? I've always thought they were similar looking in age...

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Re: My Summer Love Letter to James Bond: A Series of Bond Reviews

Bibi is 17 and Melina is 23. Melina, however, is grieving

1. For Your Eyes Only      2. The Living Daylights    3 From Russia with Love  4. Casino Royale  5. OHMSS  6. Skyfall

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Re: My Summer Love Letter to James Bond: A Series of Bond Reviews

broadshoulder wrote:

Bibi is 17 and Melina is 23. Melina, however, is grieving

It's a lot less creepy...but it's still quite a gap.

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Re: My Summer Love Letter to James Bond: A Series of Bond Reviews

Moore certainly seems a lot more at ease with the late Mrs Brosnan, in her  thirties at the time.

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Re: My Summer Love Letter to James Bond: A Series of Bond Reviews

Barbel wrote:

Moore certainly seems a lot more at ease with the late Mrs Brosnan, in her  thirties at the time.

I would definitely concur with that.