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  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 19,982MI6 Agent
    I'm watching "Spartacus" (1960).I won't review it here and now, I can just say I enjoy it a lot.
    I would like to make two points:

    - Stanley Kubrick took over directing after Anthony Mann quit after just two weeks of filming. Kubrick, a young director with no experience with big productions, needed only a weekend to prepare. One can only hope.... :v

    -Lawrence Oliver and Timothy Dalton look and sound a lot like each other, especially when they are speaking softly.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,739MI6 Agent
    ;) I posted a list of some top movies made by replacement
    Directors, Spartacus was one .
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • IanFryerIanFryer Posts: 327MI6 Agent
    MrGore wrote:
    Dracula (1958) Lee/Cushing Hammer movie

    One of the best final act climax sequences I’ve seen in years. I’d forgotten how good (and unusual) this movie now seems.

    Tha last fifteen minutes is set up in a really odd and surprising way which kinda puts you off as you’re watching it. Van Helsing (Cushing) carries out a blood tranfusion on a woman. But he does it REALLY slowly. I thought it was so Cushing could show off his Dr Frankenstein medical skills.

    But no. Director Terence Fisher was messing with our heads. Tricking us into a false sense of secutity.

    Things move on. Aristotelian discovery and reversal in the story as we discover Dracula’s coffin is in the basement of this very house. Safety becomes danger in an unexpected but inevitable manner.

    Before we know it everybody is rushing around shouting, chasing, getting locked in cellars. Woman gets abducted by the Big D.

    Van Helsing and pal (Michael Gough) go haring after him, racing through the English countryside toward the German castle.

    Arriving at the castle, Dracula tries to bury a woman alive in a hole in the ground. Looks very surprised when Van Helsing arrives by fast carriage.

    Cue, running into castle, throwing things around, attempting some last minute strangling, using candlesticks as religious weapons, bright ideas arriving, running across tables, pulling down curtains, letting some light shed on the villain. Lee acts up a storm as he turns to dust.

    Happy ending.

    Now, that’s how you do a hero vs villain last act.

    Jimmy Sangster's script for this is an absolute model in how to simplify a narrative for filming. Note how the action doesn't shift to Whitby to save having to mount ship scenes, so everything is a fairly short carriage-ride away.
  • MrGoreMrGore Posts: 129MI6 Agent
    IanFryer wrote:
    Jimmy Sangster's script for this is an absolute model in how to simplify a narrative for filming. Note how the action doesn't shift to Whitby to save having to mount ship scenes, so everything is a fairly short carriage-ride away.

    They start the story with Harker's arrival at Castle Dracula. And with him already on a mission to kill Dracula. None of the longer setup from the novel. Immediately into conflict and anticipation. Harker gets turned. Then Van Helsing arrives. Sangster strips the story down to a conflict between Dracula and Van Helsing. The surrounding characters from the novel are there, but their roles are simplified. Unity of action. Unity of setting.

    The movie's script really is a perfect example of pure story extracted from the disparate elements in Stoker's original narrative. Sangster pulls out the core of the story and arranges it in set-pieces that are staged wonderfully well.

    No wonder it made Hammer so much money at the time.
  • Mr SnowMr Snow Station "J" JamaicaPosts: 1,736MI6 Agent
    Watched 'Gone Girl' last night. One of the best thrillers I've seen in a long time. Rosamund Pike steals the show - she was brilliant. An intriguing plot and you're not sure which way this is going to go. Highly recommended. -{
    "Everyone knows rock n' roll attained perfection in 1974; It's a scientific fact". - Homer J Simpson
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,739MI6 Agent
    Final Score :
    Nothing new, a by the numbers Die Hard at a football match.
    Entertaining enough to pass 90 minutes. There is a great
    Fight in a kitchen with Bautista fighting a guy even bigger
    Than him. With Pierce Brosnan making a guest appearance.
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 19,982MI6 Agent
    I watched "Marry Poppins" for the first time last night. It's a fun and inventive. The special effects must have been cutting edge back then. I still haven't seen "Brief Encounter", "A Matter of Life and Death", "Withnail & I" and several other British classics.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,739MI6 Agent
    The Cloverfield Paradox, not brilliant but would pass a slow
    Sunday afternoon.
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • ChriscoopChriscoop Belize Posts: 10,449MI6 Agent
    Deadpool 2, really enjoyed it, particularly liked the Bond inspired title mock title sequence :D
    It was either that.....or the priesthood
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,739MI6 Agent
    The 39 steps ( 1935)
    A truly classic story, which everyone must know by now, and a Book I've read a few times
    Since discovering it as a schoolboy.
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,441Chief of Staff
    Not a film, but an unsold TV pilot:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-914d27szA

    "The Man Who Disappeared", a Sherlock Holmes story based on Conan Doyle's "The Man With The Twisted Lip". I'm very forgiving of old films/TV when it comes to SFX etc, but this 1951 production doesn't even approach the classic Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce series of ten years or more earlier technically, and is well behind the roughly contemporary Arthur Howard/Marion Crawford series. Poor direction, terrible casting, etc.
  • dr. evan-gelistdr. evan-gelist SheffieldPosts: 398MI6 Agent
    The Specialist.
    James Woods is awesome in this movie.
    "You're in the wrong business... leave it to the professionals!"
    James Bond- Licence To Kill
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,716MI6 Agent
    ^^^ That is a brilliant guilty pleasure movie.

    BlackkKlansman

    One word for some reason, might that catch on?

    Edit: Oh, I get it it's so it had KKK in the middle of it. -{

    Anyway, great rousing finale but in between it was a bit ho hum. One of those odd films that is based on a true story but strangely unconvincing a lot of the time.

    It looked a bit too polished to be a film depicting its time. If it had looked scrappier you might have gone along with the idea that a cop would be dumb enough to use his own name to infiltrate a gang and then get the Klan ID card sent to his home address - I thought there would be a follow up to that.

    Still didn't really buy the idea of a black cop in the force back then, aside from one snipey guy in the office it's all cool, you never see any other racial problems, or racist reactions to him from the public.

    The KKK come out of it quite badly, I thought that was rather unfair... okay okay I'm kidding, but it might have been better to have a couple of them a bit smarter and charismatic (aside from poster boy David Duke) to generate tension. Weird to see that Duke is still doing his thing and the final scenes have the visceral power the rest of the film doesn't quite have.

    John David Washington and Adam Driver put in real star performances, good stuff.
    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • ChriscoopChriscoop Belize Posts: 10,449MI6 Agent
    The Specialist.
    James Woods is awesome in this movie.
    Loved it in the day, the score is fantastic.
    It was either that.....or the priesthood
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,441Chief of Staff
    But of course it is! :007)
  • ChriscoopChriscoop Belize Posts: 10,449MI6 Agent
    Barbel wrote:
    But of course it is! :007)
    :D {[]
    It was either that.....or the priesthood
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 19,982MI6 Agent
    Professor Marston and the wonder women (2017)

    This movie is the story of the very unconventional life of Marston, the creator of the Wonder Woman character. He was a psycology professor with his very own theory. He (Luke Evans) had to resign because of his polyamorous relationship with his wife (Rebecca Hall) and a younger woman (Bella Heathcote). They lived together and he had children with both. The women lived together for 38 years after his death. It's also worth mentioning that he and his wife invented an early version of the lie detector. He invented Wonder Woman to spread his ideas about feminism. The comic was also full of bondage, something that often popped up in the comic too. I think the movie is worth watching for the unusual relationship and the three people in it, like me you don't have to be a Wonder Woman fan to like this movie.
    There is a gaffe: Marsdon says he served in the OSS in WWI, but this espionage agancy was formed when the US entered WWII.
  • ClaytonLinClaytonLin Posts: 1MI6 Agent
    edited August 1
    I've felt great with these probiotics and seen A Simple Favor the other day. I was dragged to the theatre to see this by my girlfriend. I have to say, I enjoyed it a lot more then I expected. It's a fun movie.
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent
    edited September 2018
    Number24 wrote:
    Professor Marston and the wonder women (2017)

    This movie is the story of the very unconventional life of Marston, the creator of the Wonder Woman character. He was a psycology professor with his very own theory. He (Luke Evans) had to resign because of his polyamorous relationship with his wife (Rebecca Hall) and a younger woman (Bella Heathcote). They lived together and he had children with both. The women lived together for 38 years after his death. It's also worth mentioning that he and his wife invented an early version of the lie detector. He invented Wonder Woman to spread his ideas about feminism. The comic was also full of bondage, something that often popped up in the comic too....
    I want to see that doc.
    Those early Wonder Woman comics from the 1940s are awesomely weird stuff, its amazing they got published and I think they are a bit awkward for DC today, because whatever Marston's idea of feminism was, it's different from how the word is understood today and what a major corporation like Warner Brothers would want being sold as a children's comic.

    Women were always getting tied up, and the Amazons were always giving these verbose lectures on the virtue of "loving submission". The artist Marston used, H.G. Peter, had this pseudo-art nouveau aesthetic totally out of step with the action packed style becoming standard in superhero comics.

    In the earliest days of the superhero comics, there was a backlash from concerned parents against all the violent macho and arguably fascist imagery being sold to children, so DC hired a panel of respectable academics to advise them and appease parents. William Moulton Marston, a psychologist, was one of them, and his advice was to include more female characters and feminine values amongst all the manly men hitting each other. So they asked him to create such a comic himself. Which then consisted of an island full of scantily clad women tying each other up for fun and games, losing their strength when tied up by men, and female villains begging to be brought to Paradise Island in chains where they too could learn the virtues of "loving submission".

    Number24, I know you always appreciate a post with lots of pictures, and despite your usual distaste for comic book imagery, I can see Golden Age Wonder Woman is of particular interest to you, so, here are some random examples I found from a Google image search:

    professor-marston-wonder-women-2.jpg?auto=format&ch=Width%2CDPR&q=75&w=640&ixlib=js-1.2.0&cs=strip&crop=&s=ad099b7e75ded24244593c1e66cc80a2
    Binding-games-and-bondage-in-Wonder-Woman-comics.jpg
    peter_wonderwoman29.jpg
    image661.jpg
    wwupanel4ww13.jpg
    wonder_woman_13.jpg
    bondage-figurehead.jpg


    some of those knots used were very elaborate and precisely displayed, just in case the kiddies wanted to play along at home!
    maxresdefault.jpgsensationcomics12.jpg
    Wonder-Woman-is-full-of-bondage-themes-960400.jpg
    marston-02.jpg?w=620&h=854&q=75

    also there was spanking content:
    wonderwoman_0.jpglcdmdacxar0qlfrvbfqp.jpg

    I've read lots of Golden Age Wonder Woman, and I'm still not clear how any of this promotes feminine values, but the bondage and spanking imagery is always front and centre.

    after Marston died in 1948, Wonder Woman became a much more mediocre comic, only published because the original contract stated the copyright should return to Marston's estate should DC cease publication, and they always wanted to sell lunchboxes and t-shirts with the characters image even if the comic itself wasn't making much money.
  • DrydenDryden UKPosts: 131MI6 Agent
    The Predator

    More cheese than a French buffet.
  • DrydenDryden UKPosts: 131MI6 Agent
    Been struck down with a bit of 'man flu' this weekend so, being a little housebound I thought I'd look up some old favourites

    Last night was 'Trading Places' - still, for me, Murphy and Ackroyd's finest hour and that's not even touching on the universally superb supporting cast.

    Genuinely laugh out loud funny even after 35 years and numerous viewings.
  • GymkataGymkata Minnesota, USAPosts: 4,148MI6 Agent
    I recently re-watched TRADING PLACES as well. I still think it's one of the best comedies of the 80s, and the film has aged beautifully. It's pretty consistently funny from beginning to end with very few (if any) lulls where it fails to generate a smirk. Great stuff.
    Current rankings (updated 12/21)
    OHMSS>FRWL>CR>TSWLM>NTTD>MR>SF>FYEO>GE>DN>YOLT>OP>
    TND>TWINE>QOS>TB>TMWTGG>GF>LALD>TLD>AVTAK>SP>DAF>LTK>DAD
    Bond rankings: Lazenby>Moore>Connery>Craig>Brosnan>Dalton
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 19,982MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    Professor Marston and the wonder women (2017)

    This movie is the story of the very unconventional life of Marston, the creator of the Wonder Woman character. He was a psycology professor with his very own theory. He (Luke Evans) had to resign because of his polyamorous relationship with his wife (Rebecca Hall) and a younger woman (Bella Heathcote). They lived together and he had children with both. The women lived together for 38 years after his death. It's also worth mentioning that he and his wife invented an early version of the lie detector. He invented Wonder Woman to spread his ideas about feminism. The comic was also full of bondage, something that often popped up in the comic too....
    I want to see that doc.
    Those early Wonder Woman comics from the 1940s are awesomely weird stuff, its amazing they got published and I think they are a bit awkward for DC today, because whatever Marston's idea of feminism was, it's different from how the word is understood today and what a major corporation like Warner Brothers would want being sold as a children's comic.

    Women were always getting tied up, and the Amazons were always giving these verbose lectures on the virtue of "loving submission". The artist Marston used, H.G. Peter, had this pseudo-art nouveau aesthetic totally out of step with the action packed style becoming standard in superhero comics.

    In the earliest days of the superhero comics, there was a backlash from concerned parents against all the violent macho and arguably fascist imagery being sold to children, so DC hired a panel of respectable academics to advise them and appease parents. William Moulton Marston, a psychologist, was one of them, and his advice was to include more female characters and feminine values amongst all the manly men hitting each other. So they asked him to create such a comic himself. Which then consisted of an island full of scantily clad women tying each other up for fun and games, losing their strength when tied up by men, and female villains begging to be brought to Paradise Island in chains where they too could learn the virtues of "loving submission".

    Number24, I know you always appreciate a post with lots of pictures, and despite your usual distaste for comic book imagery, I can see Golden Age Wonder Woman is of particular interest to you, so, here are some random examples I found from a Google image search:

    professor-marston-wonder-women-2.jpg?auto=format&ch=Width%2CDPR&q=75&w=640&ixlib=js-1.2.0&cs=strip&crop=&s=ad099b7e75ded24244593c1e66cc80a2
    Binding-games-and-bondage-in-Wonder-Woman-comics.jpg
    peter_wonderwoman29.jpg
    image661.jpg
    wwupanel4ww13.jpg
    wonder_woman_13.jpg
    bondage-figurehead.jpg


    some of those knots used were very elaborate and precisely displayed, just in case the kiddies wanted to play along at home!
    maxresdefault.jpgsensationcomics12.jpg
    Wonder-Woman-is-full-of-bondage-themes-960400.jpg
    marston-02.jpg?w=620&h=854&q=75

    also there was spanking content:
    wonderwoman_0.jpglcdmdacxar0qlfrvbfqp.jpg

    I've read lots of Golden Age Wonder Woman, and I'm still not clear how any of this promotes feminine values, but the bondage and spanking imagery is always front and centre.

    after Marston died in 1948, Wonder Woman became a much more mediocre comic, only published because the original contract stated the copyright should return to Marston's estate should DC cease publication, and they always wanted to sell lunchboxes and t-shirts with the characters image even if the comic itself wasn't making much money.

    Thanks for the post, but "Professor Marston and the wonder women" is a feature movie and not a documentary. It looks like you will enjoy it. I did, and I'm notneven interested in superhero comics. I do enjoy comics and I don't feel any distaste for it.
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,716MI6 Agent
    How does she get out of the water tank?
    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,739MI6 Agent
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • ChriscoopChriscoop Belize Posts: 10,449MI6 Agent
    Ive not read a good or even slightly positive review yet. Seems marvel have lost their magic on this one.
    It was either that.....or the priesthood
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,739MI6 Agent
    From a house on willow street :
    An odd horror film, built around the premise .... What if
    You kidnapped someone, only to find they are possessed
    By an evil spirit !
    Sadly not as much fun as it should have been.
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • GymkataGymkata Minnesota, USAPosts: 4,148MI6 Agent
    Chriscoop wrote:
    Ive not read a good or even slightly positive review yet. Seems marvel have lost their magic on this one.

    VENOM isn't a Marvel Cinematic Universe movie. It doesn't exist with Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, etc. VENOM is owned by Sony as part of their rights to Spiderman and his universe of characters. Sony worked a deal with Marvel to get Spiderman into the main cinematic universe, but they retained exclusive rights to the other characters (like Venom), so you should view it as its own thing.
    Current rankings (updated 12/21)
    OHMSS>FRWL>CR>TSWLM>NTTD>MR>SF>FYEO>GE>DN>YOLT>OP>
    TND>TWINE>QOS>TB>TMWTGG>GF>LALD>TLD>AVTAK>SP>DAF>LTK>DAD
    Bond rankings: Lazenby>Moore>Connery>Craig>Brosnan>Dalton
  • GymkataGymkata Minnesota, USAPosts: 4,148MI6 Agent
    A STAR IS BORN (2018)

    This is pretty excellent across the board. Great acting from everyone, including the supporting roles, and very solid direction from Bradley Cooper. The songs are all strong and they're performed with appropriate skill and finesse. This thing is gonna clean house at the Academy Awards next year, with Lady Gaga a lock for Best Actress and Sam Elliot a lock for Best Supporting Actor.

    Recommended.
    Current rankings (updated 12/21)
    OHMSS>FRWL>CR>TSWLM>NTTD>MR>SF>FYEO>GE>DN>YOLT>OP>
    TND>TWINE>QOS>TB>TMWTGG>GF>LALD>TLD>AVTAK>SP>DAF>LTK>DAD
    Bond rankings: Lazenby>Moore>Connery>Craig>Brosnan>Dalton
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent
    How does she get out of the water tank?
    I'm glad somebody is asking the important questions.

    that page is from Wonder Woman 6, Fall 1943, and is the first appearance of Wonder Woman's arch enemy the Cheetah. The woman who adds Wonder Woman's magic lasso to the knots is Priscilla Rich, who will become the Cheetah in a few more pages. I believe this character is to be the villain in the second film, played by Kristen Wiig, so if you want to do your homework, this is a good issue to track down, I know its reprinted in Wonder Woman Archives volume 3.

    Somebody wrote an entire Blog page about this issue, with many examples of the artwork, including the very next page in this exciting sequence.
    ww6_002.png
    if you cant see the above image I've tried to link to, she literally chews through the leather mask, then is able to reach the lasso with her teeth, following some gymnastic contortions. The following page actually shows her kicking free of the lasso and making her triumphant escape, but I cant find that page anywhere on line that I can link to, so you will just have to use your imagination.
    or...
    shh, don't tell anybody but you can accidentally download a research copy of Wonder Woman 6 here:>*.
    A *.cbz extension is just a zip file, so you should be able to open it with WinZip or other similar tools.
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