Those 60s Bond singles - not quite the same?

Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,116MI6 Agent
The most marked is Nancy Sinatra's You Only Live Twice, which I bought as a single though I have it as album track. That was just an indulgence, though it's been argued on the vinyl thread that singles sound better than album tracks, on account of having more space to devote to the sound.

But this version lacks the lush Barry orchestration. It has a raggedy electric guitar and sounds a bit lo-fi. There's a case for doing a groovy version of YOLT with those funky bass guitars or something that feature on the soundtrack itself sometimes, to make it a bit Austin Powers, but this isn't it and it's a bit disappointing.
The B-side called Jackson is a C+W tune, quite famous and rather good.

Then I get the single of Goldfinger. This does have the orchestration but is still not quite the same as the one we all know. Bassey's vocal take seems different, a bit more improvised and off the beat. Not bad but not the same.
Again, the James Bond theme single is v similar but spikier and punkier, livelier and less stately than the one we know, even though it was surely released at the time of Dr No.
What gives? Why do they do this?

Was it for some kind of copywrite reason that the single is different?

You get this stuff on other releases. A John Barry collection doesn't have the same Tom Jones version of Thunderball, it's a bit more rock n roll, less lush, same for the version of OHMSS.
The vocals for TB and YOLT were not even allowed on the brilliant 1971 release, The James Bond Collection, which spanned Dr No to DAF.
"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

Comments

  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 31,301Chief of Staff
    Two versions of the "James Bond Theme" were cut in 1962, one for the single and one for the film. Barry's single was initially on a different label, hence the need for two versions.

    The Shirley Bassey "Goldfinger" was released in both mono and stereo, which have different vocals and mixes.

    Tom Jones's TB single was definitely edited, I can't recall if it was remixed as well.

    After Nancy Sinatra recorded YOLT with John Barry, she recorded a different version in the USA with, IIRC, Billy Strange arranging & conducting. I agree that it's disappointing.
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,116MI6 Agent
    "Refreshing to know there's one subject you are an expert on..." -{
    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 31,301Chief of Staff
    In the 50s and 60s there were often differences between the mono and stereo versions of songs, the most well-known cases naturally involving The Beatles. http://gloriousnoise.com/2009/beatles_stereo_mono_difference Since the first Bond soundtracks were in the 60s, there are often differences in mixes or even takes in the songs or cues between mono and stereo.

    Here are a few links which might be of interest on this topic and related matters:

    https://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/help-with-collecting-james-bond-007-soundtracks.288504/

    https://songsfromsodeep.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/from-russia-with-love-matt-monro/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udd6s3M5cD8

    https://www.hometheaterforum.com/community/threads/james-bond-007-soundtracks-golden-gun-spy-moonraker-view-to-a-kill-octopussy.322777/

    Sometimes when a track was recorded in stereo but issued in mono, the engineer would do what is known as a "fold down" mix- ie, attempt to reproduce the same balance of sound with as little difference as possible. At other times, a dedicated mono mix was created which may have significant differences. Only careful listening can discern the differences, and only taste can decide which one prefers.
  • ChriscoopChriscoop Belize Posts: 10,435MI6 Agent
    Barbel, you can't listen to the beatles, mono or stereo without earmuffs! You should know that, it's standard operating procedure.
    It was either that.....or the priesthood
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 31,301Chief of Staff
    :)) :)) :))
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 2,350MI6 Agent
    The most marked is Nancy Sinatra's You Only Live Twice, ... this version lacks the lush Barry orchestration. It has a raggedy electric guitar and sounds a bit lo-fi. There's a case for doing a groovy version of YOLT with those funky bass guitars or something that feature on the soundtrack itself sometimes, to make it a bit Austin Powers, but this isn't it and it's a bit disappointing.
    The B-side called Jackson is a C+W tune, quite famous and rather good.
    what you're describing sounds more like her regular sound with Lee Hazelwood, sort of a subtly psychedelicized country vibe, and I know the two of them did a version of Jackson together.

    Maybe she recorded her own version of the song completely separate from the official soundtrack lp and Barry?
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 31,301Chief of Staff
    Er... like I said above in post 2?
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 2,350MI6 Agent
    so you did!
  • lotuslotus englandPosts: 287MI6 Agent
    ive got a mono vinyl copy of thunderball and the track ….mr kiss kiss bang bang …..is fantastic
  • Colonel SmithersColonel Smithers Posts: 18MI6 Agent
    Barbel,
    What about Matt Monro's 'From Russia with Love' single, does it differ from the LP? Do you know if it’s an edit, different mix or vocal take? Lastly, if it is different, do you know if the single version is on ‘The George Martin Years’ CD? Thank you. -{
    R-9029406-1473551235-3711.jpeg.jpg
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