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Re: Colonel Sun

That's a good review, has the ring of truth. I sort of read bits of it years ago. I found the M thing a bit disturbing and not the usual Bond thing; it did denigrade the character a bit I found. One good sex scene with Ariadne (and Fleming was about the only author who had the stomach for sex scenes imo) and that's about it. It wasn't like you could dip into it and get little nuggets that made you want to read on, irrespective of the plot chronology.

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Colonel Sun

Interestingly, Fleming's widow Anne HATED CS. She was - and remained - against anyone continuing the Bond series, and ESPECIALLY, Amis. She feared Bond would end up like his character Lucky Jim, flaunting authority and selling out his country to the Russians. According Lycett's Fleming bio, she wrote a scathing review of the book for a London newspaper that was never published for fear of a libel suit! Amis said he loved writing the book because he got to tweak some of his leftist friends.

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Re: Colonel Sun

Out of all of the post-Fleming authors Bond novels, I enjoyed Kingsley Amis' Colonel Sun above them all, including Jeffery Deaver's Carte Blanche which was pretty good IMO.
Bond's relationship with M is revealed alot more, his "love scene" with Ariadne Alexandrou is quite riske (at least that's what I thought when reading this novel on the train into work one morning) and I still remember feeling squeamy when the power drill came out.

Drawn Out Dad.
Independent, one-shot comic books from the outskirts of Melbourne, Australia.
twitter.com/DrawnOutDad

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Re: Colonel Sun

asio wrote:

Out of all of the post-Fleming authors Bond novels, I enjoyed Kingsley Amis' Colonel Sun above them all, including Jeffery Deaver's Carte Blanche which was pretty good IMO.
Bond's relationship with M is revealed alot more, his "love scene" with Ariadne Alexandrou is quite riske (at least that's what I thought when reading this novel on the train into work one morning) and I still remember feeling squeamy when the power drill came out.


Do not forget that Kingsley was the first novel he wrote after the death of Fleming, and people think that it was he who ended TMWGG.With respect to Carte Blanche, I prefer Devil May Care to Carta Blanca, and before Colonel Sun at  Devil May Care

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Re: Colonel Sun

I re-visited this novel recently and have to say - It is indeed perhaps a little more "realistic" than some of Fleming's and certainly makes it more suitable for today's audiences especially the generation that in the last decade has been introduced to the whole 24 and Jason Bourne style of espionage and thrills. Yes of course due to the time when it was published it still has that feeling of the period but in terms of thrills and darkness that todays audiences expect it achieves this easily. I for one have always liked this novel -despite its slowing down in the middle. Lets face it -you watch a movie its success is monitored by its peaks and troughs if the pace dips it is to allow for the tale to build to another exciting peak. The audience is taken from one point to another. The pre - title sequence in a Bond movie excites us then the tale develops building up to a particular moment -then it levels out and builds again. It is essentially the same with a novel. Amis achieves this throughout the novel -yes it slows down in the middle but builds the tension expertly.

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Re: Colonel Sun

I just finished Colonel Sun, my first non-Fleming novel. And over all I have to say I enjoyed it.

One of my complaints are that the character of Sun isn't fleshed out enough. Also at the end when he apologized to Bond and asked for his forgiveness for the torture, it seems very unrealistic and made the character a lot less intimidating. When Bond stabs a man to death who's asking for his forgiveness it doesn't make it as dramatic and satisfying.

Also the chapter ""The Temporary Captain" comes off as completely pointless. He could have simply mentioned the boat swap in another chapter, then have Sun tell Bond the man's fate when they first meet face to face. I dont see why we need a detailed account of it. Seems to just drag the story down

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Re: Colonel Sun

I'm reading it again now and really like it. Its more like Fleming than the other continuation novels in my view

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Re: Colonel Sun

I'm writing a piece on Colonel Sun at the moment on the increased levels of violence depicted in the novel and also on the rather unusual death meted out to Colonel Sun Laing-tan.

What are our thoughts on these overlooked aspects of Colonel Sun by Kingsley Amis?

Writer/Director @ The Bondologist Blog (TBB)
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"The man who was only a silhouette." - Ian Fleming, Moonraker (1955).

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Re: Colonel Sun

P.S. The piece is called 'The Strange Death of Colonel Sun' and I want to try and get it posted on The Bondologist Blog soonish. It's a lenghty piece focusing on a very specific part of the Colonel Sun novel and its particularly unusual villain and villain death scene - though there are some links back to the original Fleming novels and forward to the Eon Bond films.

Writer/Director @ The Bondologist Blog (TBB)
On Twitter: @Dragonpol 
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"The man who was only a silhouette." - Ian Fleming, Moonraker (1955).

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Re: Colonel Sun

The Bondologist Blog is proud to present a Guest Article today by Colonel Sun expert Hank Reineke:

http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.co.u … ssier.html

I'd love to hear your thoughts on his follow-up to his famous October 2005 007 Magazine article "The Dossier on Robert Markham".  ajb007/smile  ajb007/martini

Writer/Director @ The Bondologist Blog (TBB)
On Twitter: @Dragonpol 
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"The man who was only a silhouette." - Ian Fleming, Moonraker (1955).

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Re: Colonel Sun

Thank you again, SM, a very interesting article and I am much appreciative that the interest in Amis’ role in the Bond canon is very much alive.  I thought it better to tackle this here in AJB, since I’m more acquainted with the audience here.  In Hank Reineke's article, from the 2nd paragraph, he states:

" ..there's no doubt now that Amis did receive a remittance for his time and effort for working on the final typescript of that novel... " 

...and he goes on to present from Jon Gilbert's book all the background information on how deep Amis got involved with TMWTGG. But then he concludes: 

"But all evidence suggests the changes made by Amis and several others made privy to the typescript were all grammatical and/or minor and cosmetic in nature; no one involved had dared change the author's intent or altered the storyline in any manner; No matter what the fanciful conspiracy-theorists might suggest."

This seems self-contradictory, or in the least, a large leap was made from the statements of my first quote to the second quote, especially within the scope of the same paragraph and Hank didn’t present data to support that last statement.  Where's "all (the) evidence"?  ...and in the least, he could have provided the same amount of background information as he did in support of his earlier statement (my first quote).  Based on the data Hank did (and did not) present, I would say that the jury is still out on the extent of Amis' ghostwriting.

BTW, I have a copy of Gilbert's Bibliography, so I think I shall crack it open and read about TMWTGG myself before I sell it!

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Colonel Sun

sharpshooter wrote:

CS is a magnificent novel. Amis may have only done one, but what a novel to do. It is very rich in detail and violence. I proudly include it in the Fleming timeline.

I read Col Sun several years ago, but re-read near the back of the book recently where Sun has captured Bond and
with the recent Spectre film, people say the torture scene is taken from the CS book.
Well I noticed that there is text where Sun talks of a man who he gouged his eyes out and "There was no one there in his head".
This section has been used word-for-word as spoken by Blofeld in the new film.
I didn't realise how similiar it is.

Bleuville.

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Re: Colonel Sun

Could be wrong here but, I think Barbel  posted before on this subject that there is
an end credit about Col Sun in Spectre.

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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Re: Colonel Sun

Thunderpussy wrote:

Could be wrong here but, I think Barbel  posted before on this subject that there is
an end credit about Col Sun in Spectre.

Indeed an end credit.   

Must read the section again

Instagram - bondclothes007

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Re: Colonel Sun

welshboy78 wrote:
Thunderpussy wrote:

Could be wrong here but, I think Barbel  posted before on this subject that there is
an end credit about Col Sun in Spectre.

Indeed an end credit.   

Must read the section again

Yes, they thank the Estate of Kingsley Amis at the end of the film. I sat on in the cinema as the last person in order to confirm this!  ajb007/biggrin

Writer/Director @ The Bondologist Blog (TBB)
On Twitter: @Dragonpol 
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"The man who was only a silhouette." - Ian Fleming, Moonraker (1955).

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Re: Colonel Sun

Thunderpussy wrote:

Could be wrong here but, I think Barbel  posted before on this subject that there is
an end credit about Col Sun in Spectre.

You're quite right TP, I did.  ajb007/cheers

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Re: Colonel Sun

You see, I don't  just read my own posts.  ajb007/wink

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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Re: Colonel Sun

Thunderpussy wrote:

Could be wrong here but, I think Barbel  posted before on this subject that there is
an end credit about Col Sun in Spectre.

Yes I saw that film credit at the end of Spectre.   
The text in the book is about page 260 in Chapter 19- "The Theory and Practice of Torture".

Bleuville.

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Re: Colonel Sun

The inclusion of material from Colonel Sun in Spectre excited me greatly, because for the first time the film series has acknowledged a contribution from the continuation series. While I don't necessarily expect them to continue mining material from the other continuations, at least it sets a precedent for looking beyond Fleming for material.

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Re: Colonel Sun

Golrush007 wrote:

The inclusion of material from Colonel Sun in Spectre excited me greatly, because for the first time the film series has acknowledged a contribution from the continuation series. While I don't necessarily expect them to continue mining material from the other continuations, at least it sets a precedent for looking beyond Fleming for material.

I felt exactly the same way as you! That's partly why I rank Spectre at No. 3 in my Bond films list.  ajb007/smile  ajb007/martini

Writer/Director @ The Bondologist Blog (TBB)
On Twitter: @Dragonpol 
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"The man who was only a silhouette." - Ian Fleming, Moonraker (1955).