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  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,036MI6 Agent
    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,036MI6 Agent

    I can't get the hang of this new website. Anyway, it's something about how folk meet for a reunion and begin to find they no longer have as much in common as they thought and it gets awkward. Will try to find the library book - they don't call it in due to Covid, just keep renewing us forever so no incentive to read these things.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 30,897Chief of Staff

    CoolHandBond did the favours a few posts back, Napoleon, so don't worry about it.

    Re the 1930s version of "She"- it's easily available, very cheap, on eBay. I enjoyed it very much.

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,036MI6 Agent

    I can't find it. What am I doing wrong?

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 30,897Chief of Staff
    edited April 30

    Have a hunt through these (I just gave a sample page):

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?sid=pauwaldro_9&isRefine=true&_pgn=18&rt=nc

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,036MI6 Agent

    'We don't have what you're looking for sir, but perhaps you'd like to try these...'

    Like when my sister and I went off to see Star Wars in 1979 in Brighton for the first time but ended up with Close Encounters - not Hans Solo but Richard Dreyfuss and a load of mash potato.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 2,226MI6 Agent

    and I cant follow this conversation of non-sequiturs!

    are we looking for the 1935 version of She? is that what Napoleon cant find, even down in Brighton?

    kind of a hard title to do a google search for, but here's a colourised version up on youtube

    don't know why it says "Ray Harryhausen presents...", he wasn't making films for another decade

  • chrisno1chrisno1 LondonPosts: 1,028MI6 Agent

    don't know why it says "Ray Harryhausen presents...", he wasn't making films for another decade

    Harryhausen had something to do with the colourisation

  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 30,897Chief of Staff

    That's where I got my copy. Perhaps they've sold out now.

    (Not Brighton, the link I sent, just to avoid any confusion. We wouldn't want that, now.)

  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 2,226MI6 Agent
    edited May 1

    I know I actually have the dvd myself, it was an impulse purchase from a used bookstore because I like Haggard, and have read about a dozen of his novels.

    It looks like this:

    I just dug it out of the Potts Archives of Fine Films for a closer look,

    It's a two dvd set on the KINO label, both the original b&w and colourised versions, loads of bonus documentaries including interview and commentary from Harryhausen. I should watch this again just cuz I've been on a Harryhausen kick lately, and I can see why he'd be a fan of a Haggard based story.

  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 30,897Chief of Staff
    edited May 1

    Napoleon, I've checked that link above- "She" is definitely there, you'll just have to go looking for it.

    Edit- it's a bare-bones version, not like the one caractacus has.

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,036MI6 Agent

    Still, flaws with this new website - I've got to my PMs where c Potts would obviously be looking for my address so he can send me his copy, but it just hasn't got through yet. SiCo, sort it out!




    (This should come with a quirky bespoke emoticon that would either take the sting out of the comment or enrage Potts but none can be found...)

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • chrisno1chrisno1 LondonPosts: 1,028MI6 Agent
    edited May 2

    I was going to post this in the James Bond Literature section, but couldn't find a relevant thread - is there one? - and didn't fancy starting my own for one book, so it's ended up here.

    MY NAME IS BOND, JAMES BOND

    Ian Fleming

    2000

    (Compiled by Simon Winder)

    A celebration of Ian Fleming’s descriptive prowess as a novelist, My Name is Bond, James Bond doesn’t tell us anything we don’t already know about Fleming or about Bond.

    It’s an interesting compilation of scenes taken from across the spectrum of the novels and not always from the places we would expect them to come from. In his preface, Simon Winder painfully points out that he doesn’t want to spoil anyone’s enjoyment by revealing details of a novel’s narrative, in particular their conclusions. This rather reduces the material available to him, but he does a fair job of assessing and categorising Fleming’s work.

    He’s split it into sixteen sections with heading such as The Man, Foreign Travel, Sex or Eating. It was strange to read these passages out of context. Some of them didn’t sit well at all. Many of the quotes from The Spy Who Loved Me are horrible in their misunderstanding [or perhaps a misrepresentation?] of women’s emotions. The stuffiness of the atmosphere and pretentions of Blades in Moonraker comes across as terribly dated and pompous. Other extracts amused me with the author’s almost childlike prose. Several excerpts from Goldfinger do not come across well at all.

    I was more surprised by the sections Winder left out. He reproduces in full three long scenes: the centipede menacing Bond from Dr No, Bond in the Garden of Death from You Only Live Twice, Tatiana meeting Rosa Klebb (From Russia With Love) and Bond meeting Oddjob from Goldfinger. While each of these scenes have merit, I can’t fathom why we don’t have: Bond’s midnight scuba swim to the Disco Volante from Thunderball, the opening scene and sentence of Casino Royale, the death of the Mexican from Goldfinger, Bond’s seduction of Tatiana (From Russia With Love), or the final paragraphs from You Only Live Twice. These surely reveal Fleming’s abilities as a descriptive and intuitive writer far more than the extended passages chosen – or even the shorter ones which abound the full 140+ pages.

    Simply letting the extracts sit without explanation or analysis feels like a missed a an opportunity. Winder should have studied Fleming’s craft and examined why some scenes, characters and situations work so well and others do not. Now that would be a book worth reading. This celebration is rather aimless.  


  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 2,226MI6 Agent

    chrisno1 said:

    I was going to post this in the James Bond Literature section, but couldn't find a relevant thread - is there one? - and didn't fancy starting my own for one book, so it's ended up here.

    this thread?

    under  JAMES BOND LITERATURE: What are you Currently Reading?

    I always think that thread and this thread oughta have more specific titles, like What are you Currently Reading That is Bond Related? and What are you Currently Reading That is Not Bond Related?

  • chrisno1chrisno1 LondonPosts: 1,028MI6 Agent
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 17,619MI6 Agent

    "A column of fire" by Ken Follett

    This is Follet's third brick-sized novel in the Kingsbridge series after "Pillars of the Earth" and "World without end". Recently he wrote the turn of the millennium-set prequel "The morning and the evening". Follett does historical novels spanning many years, characters and pages very well. He incorpirates history into the story in a way that doesn't seem forced and makes the world come alive.

    Collumn is set in the late 16th and early 17th century, right in the middle of reformation and Elizabeth I. reign.

    Unlike the other Kingsbridge novels (Well, I haven't read "World without end" yet) most of the story takes place outside fiction al Kingsbridge, taking us as far as Paris, Spain and even the New World. At first I experienced this as a weakness, but gradually it reeled me in. In the two Kingsbridge novel I read before this one the plot was also focused on the making of a major construction, a bridge and a cathedral. Not so in Collumn. Instead the plot revolver around religious freedom and intelligence work. Ned Willard who is the closest to a main character we get in the book, works for Queen Elizabeth's M. Other characters are also involved in espionage. The Elizabethan era was an important and exiting age in the history of espionage.

    If you want to read an entertaining book, learn some history in the process and even have a Elizabethan espionage plot rolled into the mix... then A Collumn of Fire is for you.

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