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  • ant007ukant007uk Great BritainPosts: 67MI6 Agent
    I've just started a book by Dean Koontz called "The Taking", I hoping its going to be as good as his other novels.
  • darenhatdarenhat The Old PuebloPosts: 2,029Quartermasters
    edited November 2005
    Finally read The Power of One after having purchased it about 15 years ago. Certainly a rich, colorful account of life in South Africa during the war, but I was a bit dismayed of the overall story. Even as a child, the central character was a bit too perfect, despite everything going on around him. I would have related a bit more if the character showed some failures in his attempts to apply his perspective on the world and social system that he was in.
  • WOOD AlexWOOD Alex Posts: 5MI6 Agent
    At Risk by Stella Rimington, the former head of MI5. It's brilliant. Fast paced, plenty of twists and a great protagonist, Liz Carlyle. I would recommend this book to anyone.
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 31,517Chief of Staff
    "Absolute Power", by David Baldacci. Not bad, but the film was better.
  • scaramanga1scaramanga1 The English RivieraPosts: 840Chief of Staff
    The Tesseract by Alex Garland - I really like this book -although it wasn't as popular as The Beach.
  • NAOMI_FAN 1NAOMI_FAN 1 Posts: 85MI6 Agent
    The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

    (Yes.........it's THAT good!!)
  • TracyTracy the VillagePosts: 369MI6 Agent
    The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

    (Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

    Would you happen to be an Ice Station Zebra fan of the same author? :D
    Flattery will get you nowhere, but don't stop trying.
  • MrsDallowayMrsDalloway Posts: 79MI6 Agent
    Hardyboy wrote:
    "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte

    X-(

    For school....

    The " X-( " is probably because you read it for school. Jane Eyre is a great novel; it's one that can best be appreciated when it isn't being shoved down your throat.


    How true. After paddling in the shallows of contemporary fiction for a few years after my schooling, I discovered Orwell, then back-tracked through many of those same authors I'd previously found 'challenging': Austen, Bronte, Forster et al. With the scales removed from my eyes I was able to discover a much greater depth than I'd thought possible.

    I seem to spend a lot of time re-reading books I enjoyed in my youth - something I said I'd never do. A fruitless attempt to recapture a lost innocence?
    Appropriately, this year I've revisited Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh - no doubt familiar to many of you through the marvellous television adaptation. It's a wonderfully evocative book with decay and loss of innocence as it's central themes.

    I was going to list others I've dipped into this year, but perhaps I'll save those for another time.
  • Tee HeeTee Hee CBT Headquarters: Chicago, ILPosts: 917MI6 Agent
    Yea I had to read Jane Eyre for school last year. It was such a boring read to me that I ended up not finishing the book for the final test. The plot is rather boring in the beginning, but it does pick up towards the end. I found myself amazed by the book's most bizare twist however. I guess it depends on the reader, but I often find that the books considered "classics" are the most putrid pieces of literature. I'm definitely not a reader. Give me a television any day.

    P.S. The best thing that ever happened to the Jane Eyre story was casting Timothy Dalton as Rochester in its playwright adaptation. :)
    "My acting range? Left eyebrow raised, right eyebrow raised..."

    -Roger Moore
  • MrsDallowayMrsDalloway Posts: 79MI6 Agent
    Tee Hee wrote:
    I often find that the books considered "classics" are the most putrid pieces of literature. I'm definitely not a reader. Give me a television any day.


    That's an interesting point of view.
    Would you care to elaborate?
  • superadosuperado Regent's Park West (CaliforniaPosts: 2,560MI6 Agent
    edited November 2005
    I just finished reading "Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner." I've owned this book for about 8 years but have only read isolated portions. Finally, I managed to read everything, begining with the acknowlegements and ending with the appendix section. I find fascinating how this one movie underwent a saga of development begining with a popular sci-fi novel written during the socially conscious 60's, then to the struggles to get it on screen, the box-office failure it endured, and culminating in it's vindication as a profound work of art in its growing following and the 2nd theatrical release a decade after. I recommend this book not just to fans of the movie, but for anyone who has an interest in the film-making process as it explores the artistic as well as business aspects of movie production, marketing, and managing a host of diverse contributors of talent.

    I received in the mail just this week another BR book, entitled, "Retrofitting Blade Runner," which is a collection of essays that explore the different social and philosophical aspects of the film and the book it's based on, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" written by Philip K. Dick.

    I'm not really a big sci-fi fan beyond the pedestrian consumption of the Star Wars and Matrix movies, but I fell in love with Blade Runner when it came out in 1982, and despite its poor box office performance, I watched it 8 times within a span of 6 weeks since it opened. Its director, Ridley Scott set out to de-emphasize action (the action film format that we're familiar with today was just begining to be defined during that time) and compensate by creating "visual depth" in every shot, to the frustration of those involved, including Harrison Ford and the studio. That is why books such as the ones mentioned serve to unlock the film's tiniest nuances that open up to intriguing concepts that were purposely infused therin, which of course would go unnoticed in a casual viewing.
    "...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....
  • NAOMI_FAN 1NAOMI_FAN 1 Posts: 85MI6 Agent
    Tracy wrote:
    The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

    (Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

    Would you happen to be an Ice Station Zebra fan of the same author? :D

    Yes! I love everything by Maclean! i really think his stuff is brilliant!
  • Bullitt68Bullitt68 Posts: 7MI6 Agent
    Tracy wrote:
    The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

    (Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

    Would you happen to be an Ice Station Zebra fan of the same author? :D

    Yes! I love everything by Maclean! i really think his stuff is brilliant!
    I haven't read all of Maclean's novels but I have read Ice Station Zebra. It's an outstanding book with great atmosphere.
  • NAOMI_FAN 1NAOMI_FAN 1 Posts: 85MI6 Agent
    Bullitt68, you MUST read The Golden Gate! If you enjoyed Ice Station Zebra, you will enjoy this book as well!
  • TracyTracy the VillagePosts: 369MI6 Agent
    Digital Fortress-I'm embarassed to say that I wasted the course of a day off on this book. I'll be very blunt; I think Dan Brown is a hack writer. He relies on every cheap trick to hold on to the reader's attention. He's extremely formulaic for one thing-you've got the opening murder, attractive, intelligent do-good-at-all-costs protagonist, the assassin with a physical defect, the wonders of technology, double-dealing "allies" and some (European) globe-trotting, although not as much as in Angels and Demons and the Da Vinci Code. His characterizations are fairly one-dimensional; the deceptive characters' betrayals all don't quite make sense. There are lots of minor ones running around, too, making things a little confusing. I sort of saw the big twist coming, but generally I was fairly entertained. If you're an ACLU member, you'll probably be horrified by the characters' defense of the NSA Crypto unit. Brown's thrillers are a little like popcorn; they're not intellectually substantial, but they're good for a day's entertainment and keep some of your brain occupied in unravelling the multiple plotlines. And don't pay any attention to the style because there isn't one.

    The fact that I can't put the book down once I've started says something in Brown's favor.
    Flattery will get you nowhere, but don't stop trying.
  • asioasio Melbourne, AustraliaPosts: 545MI6 Agent
    edited December 2005
    Anthony Horowitz's Stormbreaker which is the first novel in the Alex Rider series.
    It's pretty much Young Bond in the modern era, and although it a Young Adult novel, I still found that I couldn't put it down.
    I'm now looking forward to reading Point Blanc, and the following novels!
    Drawn Out Dad.
    Independent, one-shot comic books from the outskirts of Melbourne, Australia.
    twitter.com/DrawnOutDad
  • darenhatdarenhat The Old PuebloPosts: 2,029Quartermasters
    Prey by Michael Crichton

    Crichton's books tend to be hit or miss, and I classify this one as a 'miss.' After the first third of the book reading about a 'desperate house-hsuband' the story proceeds into ambiguous science and technology theories, until it finally de-evolves into a cheesy sci-fi action plot. I think sometimes MC tries a bit too hard.
  • darenhatdarenhat The Old PuebloPosts: 2,029Quartermasters
    Here's an interesting read for fans of Sherlockiana...

    Against the Brotherhood by Quinn Fawcett

    This book chronicles the exploits of Sherlock Holmes' (smarter) brother, Mycroft and his loyal attache, Guthrie. I suppose the story is exactly what it should be (more international intrigue, then thrilling mystery) and stylistically Quinn Fawcett is a talented writer. Plot-wise the story is a bit lackluster, but still a passable romp.
  • Sir MilesSir Miles The Wrong Side Of The WardrobePosts: 25,314Chief of Staff
    Finished Wolves Eat Dogs by Martin Cruz Smith last week. Another case for Renko and another cracking read.
    YNWA 97
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 31,517Chief of Staff
    Currently re-reading John Gardner's "Boysie Oakes" series. Have finished "The Liquidator" and am now on "Understrike". I'd semi-forgotten how much fun this series was!
  • Royale KingRoyale King Posts: 37MI6 Agent
    i just finished bloodfever - a fantasic book :)
  • darenhatdarenhat The Old PuebloPosts: 2,029Quartermasters
    The Chinatown Deathcloud Peril

    Fantastically fun read for fans of pulp novels. Corny title, but completely accurate and appropos. The plot regales a fictional account between Walter Gibson (creator of The Shadow) and Lester Dent (creator of Doc Savage) who become entangled in uncovering a dangerous plot that threatens the population of New York's Chinatown. Doc Savage and Shadow fans will enjoy the small details author Paul Malmont incorporates into Gibson and Dent that are reminescent of their pulp alter-egos. Fun fun fun!
  • AlexAlex The Eastern SeaboardPosts: 2,695MI6 Agent
    edited October 2006
    I've been reading the author I always find myself returning to, Robert E. Howard.

    He sold his first yarn to the pulp Weird Tales at the tender age of 18 in 1924, and from then until his sad and premature death at 30, put out some of the most prolific and verbal excellence of the ages. Volume one in the series is titled Shadow Kingdoms.

    HP. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, and Two Gun Bob were the triumvirate supreme. My favorite authors besides Ian Fleming and JRR. Tolkien.

    Quite a weird mix, I know. :)
  • darenhatdarenhat The Old PuebloPosts: 2,029Quartermasters
    Alex wrote:
    I've been reading the author I always find myself returning to, Robert E. Howard.

    He sold his first yarn to the pulp Weird Tales at the tender age of 18 in 1924, and from then until his sad and premature death at 30, put out some of the most prolific and verbal excellence of the ages. Volume one in the series is titled Shadow Kingdoms.

    HP. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, and Two Gun Bob were the triumvirate supreme. My favorite authors besides Ian Fleming and JRR. Tolkien.

    Quite a weird mix, I know. :)

    If you are a fan of Lovecraft, then I suggest you peruse a copy of the book I mentioned above. HP makes a rather interesting (and fitting) appearance in the novel!
  • AlexAlex The Eastern SeaboardPosts: 2,695MI6 Agent
    Thanks, Daren. The novel sounds like a blast!

    A Cthulu mythos fan I may be, but also a Doc Savage one. Definitely look next time at B&B or Borders.

    :007)
  • Andy A 007Andy A 007 Posts: 200MI6 Agent
    Just read Casino Royale again before the movie comes out. I wanted to refresh myself so I could really know how close the film is to the book when I see it.
  • LoeffelholzLoeffelholz The United States, With LovePosts: 8,864Quartermasters
    edited October 2006
    Recently read Fleming's The Spy Who Loved Me in a single sitting---obviously the 'novelty' volume in his Bond canon, it's nevertheless quite entertaining, particularly when Bond finally shows up, about halfway through :007) Fleming's cheeky Americanisms are at their most amusing here: "This shamus is a Limey dick!" :s :))

    I'm now a third of the way through On Her Majesty's Secret Service. I started reading Casino Royale in the spring, and have been re-reading them all, in order (for the ???th time!) to help gear myself up for the more literary film incarnation...

    My admiration for the author (warts and all) continues to grow.
    "Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
    "I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
    "Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM
  • HardyboyHardyboy Posts: 5,779Chief of Staff
    Don Quixote. Yep--the Cervantes classic, this one rendered into English by Edith Grossman. Every now and then I get the urge to tackle one of the Great World Classics that weighs in at 1,000 pages or so--in the past I've handled War and Peace and Les Miserables--and I found the Don to be downright wonderful. Really, it's two separate novels--they were written ten years apart--and they're best read separately. Part One shows that violent, grossout humor is hardly an invention of the modern age; and Part Two is all about the pains of, well, being a famous literary character. Don't let the "classic" tag fool you--it's great stuff!
    Vox clamantis in deserto
  • Sir MilesSir Miles The Wrong Side Of The WardrobePosts: 25,314Chief of Staff
    YoungBond 3. Charlie Higson continues to defy logic as he turns in another great novel. This is possibly his best yet, dark in places - but not as dark as BloodFever. He certainly keeps you turning the page - not a bad trick when I'm nearly 30 yrs over the demographic that tis book is aimed at.
    If you haven't read any of the YoungBond books, you really should give them a try.
    YNWA 97
  • Golrush007Golrush007 South AfricaPosts: 3,093Quartermasters
    Andy A 007 wrote:
    Just read Casino Royale again before the movie comes out. I wanted to refresh myself so I could really know how close the film is to the book when I see it.

    I did precisely the same thing, and I was quite impressed by how closely the script did stick to the book, taking into account to change of setting (1953 France to 2006 Montenegro). Quite a few little details remained relatively intact which was part of the excitement of watching casino royale in my opinion.
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