3 fears, 2 hopes

2

Comments

  • James SuzukiJames Suzuki New ZealandPosts: 2,383MI6 Agent
    Mr Martini wrote:
    Number24 wrote:
    Bond will bed Madeleine,that's almost 100% certain. They won't be in a relationship during the entire movie, giving Bond a window of oportunity. Ane des Armas is 32 years old, but she looks about ten years younger so her in Bed with Craig will look questionable. I think the Nomi character has a different dynamic with Bond so I don't think they'll end up in bed together. It's possible Bond beds a woman who's not in the main cast between the end of the PTS and when he meets Madeleine again, a bit like the "enjoying death" scene in SF.



    Hmmmmm, what about a plot twist? Instead of Bond bedding Madeline, the movie ends with Nomi and Madeline laying a raft together. They lay next to each other looking into each others eyes. One gently sweeps the others hair off their face. As they lay there looking at each other, the camera pans up to a sunset and the credit roll.

    If its Paloma and Swann count me as interested
    “The scent and smoke and sweat of a casino are nauseating at three in the morning. "
    -Casino Royale, Ian Fleming
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 17,543MI6 Agent
    I'm experiencing very conflicting emotions about this ....
  • SeanIsTheOnlyOneSeanIsTheOnlyOne Posts: 117MI6 Agent
    @Sir Miles

    Concerning Waller-Bridge, I'm sure you can find those interviews very easily. We all know the link between Bond and the traditional gender stereotypes is obvious. Nethertheless, I don't understand what makes her think it has to be cut off.
    What is the reason ?


    @Number24

    Given I'm not American and I have absolutely nothing against feminism, I think your target is not the right one.
    If you seriously think criticizing the evolution of the series and the screenwriting choices has something to do with any conspiracy theory, I'm afraid you're misjudging me...


    @The Spy Who Never Dies

    My point was simple but it appears you didn't get it, so let me correct this misunderstanding.

    Bond is described and showed as a classy man. Furthermore, as a "sexist, misogynist dinosaur", we can see him slapping women sometimes.
    Connery's portrayal is nothing else than faithful to Fleming's works, which makes him the best Bond ever to me (I guess many people share this opinion).
    If you're familiar with the novels, you should know Bond is a complex character. I think the vintage version with all the politically incorrect aspects of his personality is much more interesting than the new one. Does it mean I approve the way he behaves towards women ? Sorry body, but I don't see anything in my sentence showing I do...
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 17,543MI6 Agent
    My post was mostly made as a joke (it really was very much inspired by Mr Floppy), but I have to admit there was a grain of seriousness to it. Much of the negativity I've seen about Waller-Bridge has been anti-feminist, so I'm glad to hear you're not one of them. However I haven't seen any sources to back up your claims about Waller-Bridge and I'd like to see where you found them.
  • SeanIsTheOnlyOneSeanIsTheOnlyOne Posts: 117MI6 Agent
    edited September 2020
    Number24 wrote:
    My post was mostly made as a joke (it really was very much inspired by Mr Floppy), but I have to admit there was a grain of seriousness to it. Much of the negativity I've seen about Waller-Bridge has been anti-feminist, so I'm glad to hear you're not one of them. However I haven't seen any sources to back up your claims about Waller-Bridge and I'd like to see where you found them.


    Take the following quotes from an interview for Deadline.com (May 2019):

    "There’s been a lot of talk about whether or not [the Bond franchise] is relevant now because of who he is and the way he treats women."

    "I think that’s bollocks. I think he's absolutely relevant now. It has just got to grow. It has just got to evolve, and the important thing is that the film treats the women properly. He doesn’t have to. He needs to be true to this character."


    The main problem is the contradiction between what she says, which is totally true, and what we saw in the trailers. After I heard Nomi talking to Bond like if he was a dog with the line "You get in my way, I will put a bullet in your knee", I was shocked by the impassive face of the man. I just thought "this is not the real James Bond", and the fact he doesn't give a damn about such a lack of respect from a young brand new 00 agent who has everything to learn is precisely what makes Nomi the kind of woman Waller-Bridge wants to bring.

    In OHMSS, Bond doesn't hesitate to slap Tracy after her provocative answer, because it is the most likely reaction Ian Fleming's character would have had. Ironically, Tracy turns out to be the strongest and most memorable female character of the series with Vesper. I also think of Anya and Wai Lin.

    I'm looking forward to seeing the movie because I'm very worried about a lot of things, especially this scene with Bond and Nomi in the room of the Jamaican house. Is James still James is the question that bothers me the most, after of course the one of Bond's possible death.
  • The Spy Who Never DiesThe Spy Who Never Dies UKPosts: 642MI6 Agent
    @ SeanIsTheOnlyOne

    If, as you seem to be saying, Waller-Bridge’s views on Bond are that well known and that against him, then the Bond producers would also know. So why would they hire her? From what I’ve read she came on board to tweak the script and add humour.

    You said: My point was simple but it appears you didn't get it, so let me correct this misunderstanding.

    If you're familiar with the novels, you should know Bond is a complex character. I think the vintage version with all the politically incorrect aspects of his personality is much more interesting than the new one. Does it mean I approve the way he behaves towards women ? Sorry body, but I don't see anything in my sentence showing I do...


    I don’t think I misunderstood, more like trying to understand.
    You said it’s totally part of the charm which implies that it’s appealing, attractive.
    Which is why I asked the question.

    Flemming’s novels were written between 1953 and 1964. Times and attitudes have changed (eg Bond smoked and drove after drinking a fair bit) and if you want to continue making Bond films that appeal or connect to today’s audiences you can’t really stick with all the attitudes of life in the 50s. You need to find other things that are “part of the charm”, while still trying to keep Bond’s character.

    I enjoyed Flemming’s novels and always enjoy Connery’s films. I would NOT like there to be a female Bond. Other 00’s can be female and as good as him but Bond should always remain male.
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 17,543MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    My post was mostly made as a joke (it really was very much inspired by Mr Floppy), but I have to admit there was a grain of seriousness to it. Much of the negativity I've seen about Waller-Bridge has been anti-feminist, so I'm glad to hear you're not one of them. However I haven't seen any sources to back up your claims about Waller-Bridge and I'd like to see where you found them.


    Take the following quotes from an interview for Deadline.com (May 2019):

    "There’s been a lot of talk about whether or not [the Bond franchise] is relevant now because of who he is and the way he treats women."

    "I think that’s bollocks. I think he's absolutely relevant now. It has just got to grow. It has just got to evolve, and the important thing is that the film treats the women properly. He doesn’t have to. He needs to be true to this character."


    The main problem is the contradiction between what she says, which is totally true, and what we saw in the trailers. After I heard Nomi talking to Bond like if he was a dog with the line "You get in my way, I will put a bullet in your knee", I was shocked by the impassive face of the man. I just thought "this is not the real James Bond", and the fact he doesn't give a damn about such a lack of respect from a young brand new 00 agent who has everything to learn is precisely what makes Nomi the kind of woman Waller-Bridge wants to bring.

    In OHMSS, Bond doesn't hesitate to slap Tracy after her provocative answer, because it is the most likely reaction Ian Fleming's character would have had. Ironically, Tracy turns to be the strongest and most memorable female character of the series with Vesper. I also think of Anya and Wai Lin.

    I'm looking forward to seeing the movie because I'm very worried about a lot of things, especially this scene with Bond and Nomi in the room of the Jamaican house. Is James still James is the question that bothers me the most, after of course the one of Bond's possible death.

    It's only natural that there is some friction and competition between Bond and Nomi, both because he used to ba a 00-agent and she's a new one and because they are both alphas. We don't know Bond's reaction to Nomi's line until we've seen the movie, there is a lot of editing in a trailer. I understand why they have included Nomi's line in the trailer because she's a new character and they have to establish her character as though and having a competitive attitude towards Bond. Bond doesn't have to be established like that in the trailer because he's Bond.
  • SeanIsTheOnlyOneSeanIsTheOnlyOne Posts: 117MI6 Agent
    edited September 2020
    @ SeanIsTheOnlyOne

    If, as you seem to be saying, Waller-Bridge’s views on Bond are that well known and that against him, then the Bond producers would also know. So why would they hire her? From what I’ve read she came on board to tweak the script and add humour.

    You said: My point was simple but it appears you didn't get it, so let me correct this misunderstanding.

    If you're familiar with the novels, you should know Bond is a complex character. I think the vintage version with all the politically incorrect aspects of his personality is much more interesting than the new one. Does it mean I approve the way he behaves towards women ? Sorry body, but I don't see anything in my sentence showing I do...


    I don’t think I misunderstood, more like trying to understand.
    You said it’s totally part of the charm which implies that it’s appealing, attractive.
    Which is why I asked the question.

    Flemming’s novels were written between 1953 and 1964. Times and attitudes have changed (eg Bond smoked and drove after drinking a fair bit) and if you want to continue making Bond films that appeal or connect to today’s audiences you can’t really stick with all the attitudes of life in the 50s. You need to find other things that are “part of the charm”, while still trying to keep Bond’s character.

    I enjoyed Flemming’s novels and always enjoy Connery’s films. I would NOT like there to be a female Bond. Other 00’s can be female and as good as him but Bond should always remain male.

    I don't think the classiness of Bond has anything to do with the concept of slapping women. Given your question turned out to mean that, I wondered if the fact I used these words side by side in the same sentence could explain the misunderstanding.

    Nevertheless, like I said, I clearly prefer the vintage version of the character than the new one. But you're right, times have changed and I know it's impossible to put Connery's Bond in a 2020 movie. I accept it but I also regret it a lot, because the sixties appear to be the golden period of the series to me...
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,696MI6 Agent
    I'm hoping for a great send off for DC
    and a great Bond film

    My fears
    That the film is too woke
    Bond is the butt of jokes
    That's about it. :)
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • James SuzukiJames Suzuki New ZealandPosts: 2,383MI6 Agent
    I'm hoping for a great send off for DC
    and a great Bond film

    My fears
    That the film is too woke
    Bond is the butt of jokes
    That's about it. :)

    -{
    I think you've summarised a lot of fears there TP.
    I want a balance. I don't want Bond slapping any women around (he hasn't done so since MWTGG) but I don't want the film to talk down to the audience, or pretend that Nomi is the only strong women to ever appear in the series (Heck, Honey Ryder killed someone with a spider and swam with a giant knife on her belt.)
    “The scent and smoke and sweat of a casino are nauseating at three in the morning. "
    -Casino Royale, Ian Fleming
  • James SuzukiJames Suzuki New ZealandPosts: 2,383MI6 Agent
    I'm hoping for a great send off for DC
    and a great Bond film

    My fears
    That the film is too woke
    Bond is the butt of jokes
    That's about it. :)

    -{
    I think you've summarised a lot of fears there TP.
    I want a balance. I don't want Bond slapping any women around (he hasn't done so since MWTGG) but I don't want the film to talk down to the audience, or pretend that Nomi is the only strong women to ever appear in the series (Heck, Honey Ryder killed someone with a spider and swam with a giant knife on her belt.)
    “The scent and smoke and sweat of a casino are nauseating at three in the morning. "
    -Casino Royale, Ian Fleming
  • Sir MilesSir Miles The Wrong Side Of The WardrobePosts: 25,129Chief of Staff
    @Sir Miles

    Concerning Waller-Bridge, I'm sure you can find those interviews very easily. We all know the link between Bond and the traditional gender stereotypes is obvious. Nethertheless, I don't understand what makes her think it has to be cut off.
    What is the reason ?

    Actually, I can’t...I can’t find them at all ?:)

    Can you please link to them for me...particularly where she states the “vintage version of Bond is so disgusting it has to be destroyed once and for all”... thanks.
    YNWA 96
  • CRC007CRC007 Posts: 31MI6 Agent
    I'd like to know if all those who are concerned with Phoebe Waller-Bridge being involved in Bond 25 have actually watched any of her shows. From what I've seen the content she's written has been fantastic and a joy to watch. Fleabag is great and to have some of that unique style brought to Bond would be something fresh.

    From what I have read she herself has stated that it was not her intention to change the Bond character. She has hinted that the film's need to evolve to keep up with the times but don't we all agree with that anyway? And in many ways isn't what Bond has been about in the past?

    I too want to know where all these interviews are coming from that hint otherwise.
    The film is in good hands I am sure. It's where they go after Craig leaves that bothers me more even if I do agree it's his time to go.
  • The Red KindThe Red Kind EnglandPosts: 1,735MI6 Agent
    I think there will be PC moments. I think we will see Bond poked a little. But as long as he's the hero and there aren't any disappointing (why oh why...) surprises, then I'm sure all will be fine.
    "Any of the opposition around..?"
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 17,543MI6 Agent
    Why is that PC? Can't women shine in a non-sexual way in Bond movies without the momnet being PC? Isn't it possible it can just be interesting characters and a good plot?
  • ichaiceichaice LondonPosts: 382MI6 Agent
    I've tried to watch a couple of Waller-Bridge's programmes and gave up after a few minutes. I have lot's of concern about this film but fingers crossed it will be alright on the night.
    Yes. Considerably!

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lukey_sparrow/
  • The Red KindThe Red Kind EnglandPosts: 1,735MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    Why is that PC? Can't women shine in a non-sexual way in Bond movies without the momnet being PC? Isn't it possible it can just be interesting characters and a good plot?

    Absolutely. The film needs strong and interesting characters (male and female) and a good plot and script.
    In the same way the film no longer needs butt slapping and the like, it doesn't need to take itself too seriously and over-compensate/ apologise in the space of 160 mins for years of anti-PC moments in Bond history (on screen and off).
    "Any of the opposition around..?"
  • Gala BrandGala Brand Posts: 1,147MI6 Agent
    Connery's portrayal is nothing else than faithful to Fleming's works, which makes him the best Bond ever to me (I guess many people share this opinion).

    This is simply untrue. Connery's Bond was physically and emotionally invulnerable.

    Fleming's Bond, on the other hand, was frequently injured physically and emotionally. He's rejected by Gala Brand and Tiffany Case, betrayed by Vesper and then when he meets the love of his life, she's murdered.

    He's injured at the end of Live and Let Die, hospitalized at the end of The Man with The Golden Gun, injured and suffering from amnesia at the end of You only Live Twice, and dead at the end of From Russia with Love.

    In the books, Bond is a nicotine addict, an alcoholic, a drug abuser, and frequently depressed.

    Connery's Bond is an interesting character but he's not Fleming's Bond.
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 17,543MI6 Agent
    edited September 2020
    I'd say both Dalton and Craig portrayed Bond more faithful to Fleming than Connery ever did.
    In my opinion Fleming's Bond is heavy drinker, no doubt. He's probably a problem drinker, but I don't consider him an alcoholic.
  • HowardBHowardB USAPosts: 2,547MI6 Agent
    I would say that the drinking issue was actually touched upon in the Brosnan films to an extent, especially the first two.
    IMO, from what I have read here and there in interviews with Brosnan, if he had had his way, his Bond would have been a darker character. Regarding Waller-Bridge, everyone is entitled to their opinion and can have at it, but when it goes into a "Craig Not Bond- like" flights of what feels like deep seated enmity supported by phantom interview quotes, for me anyway, that just makes me a little uncomfortable (but that's social media for ya'). :#
  • CheverianCheverian Posts: 1,091MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    In my opinion Fleming's Bond is heavy drinker, no doubt. He's probably a problem drinker, but I don't consider him an alcoholic.

    One detail about Fleming that often gets glossed over, probably because of all the cigarettes, is that he himself was alcoholic. I suspect he knew that Bond was, too.

    As Gala Brand noted, the Bond of the novels is a deeply flawed man.

    The Bond of the films, for all the dark touches to suggest a troubled inner life, is pure fantasy.
  • SpectreOfDefeatSpectreOfDefeat Posts: 333MI6 Agent
    Interesting. Off the top of my head I can only think of two moments where the filmic Bond is shown to be an alcoholic in a way that actually affects his character; when Bond is drinking vodka in the hotel room in TND, and when Bond is drunk on the plane in QoS. On both occasions, Bond is clearly struggling to cope with the demands of his task and drinking because of this, in a similar way to how Fleming has Bond drink in order to get over the psychological stress of killing the assassin at the start of the literary version of Goldfinger.

    But I don't think the films, certainly, make a regular thing out of Bond being an alcoholic or a problem drinker; as others have noted, it affects the fantasy/glamour element of the character.
  • Gala BrandGala Brand Posts: 1,147MI6 Agent
    No,Bond was an alcoholic. Part of it was the times--people drank more in the Sixties, the era of the three-martini lunch and a pitcher of cocktails in the evening.

    But Bond's level of drinking was staggering. The best that can be said is that he was a functioning alcoholic.

    https://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-dd-scientists-calculate-how-much-james-bond-drank-in-007-novels-20131212-story.html
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy Behind you !Posts: 63,696MI6 Agent
    In my Family Bond would be considered a light weight ;) I'm the black sheep
    as I only drink socially
    "I've been informed that there ARE a couple of QAnon supporters who are fairly regular posters in AJB."
  • Asp9mmAsp9mm Over the Hills and Far Away.Posts: 6,711MI6 Agent
    Bond wasn’t an alcoholic. Alcoholics cannot function without drinking from sun up to sunset. They can’t function to the level Bond does and they constantly crave drink, it dominates their thoughts and world. Bond is capable of not drinking for periods at a time without the need for it. That’s not an alcoholic. Bond is just a very heavy drinker.
    ..................Asp9mmSIG-1-2.jpg...............
  • Royale-les-EauxRoyale-les-Eaux LondonPosts: 269MI6 Agent
    This thread would drive Bond to drink...
  • Asp9mmAsp9mm Over the Hills and Far Away.Posts: 6,711MI6 Agent
    This thread would drive Bond to drink...

    I’ll drink to that.
    ..................Asp9mmSIG-1-2.jpg...............
  • CheverianCheverian Posts: 1,091MI6 Agent
    Asp9mm wrote:
    Bond wasn’t an alcoholic. Alcoholics cannot function without drinking from sun up to sunset. They can’t function to the level Bond does and they constantly crave drink, it dominates their thoughts and world. Bond is capable of not drinking for periods at a time without the need for it. That’s not an alcoholic. Bond is just a very heavy drinker.

    I’m sorry to have coopted this thread, but again I’m referring to Fleming’s Bond. I’m a recovering alcoholic, sober for a long time now, and I drank as hard as Bond for decades without thinking about my next drink every moment, was successful by most measures and suffered few consequences that might have slowed me down. But it’s a progressive disease (or if you prefer, disorder), as Fleming himself experienced. Call Bond whatever you want, a hard drinker, a problem drinker, pre-alcoholic, but his preoccupation with drink outstrips even the excesses of his era.
  • SeanIsTheOnlyOneSeanIsTheOnlyOne Posts: 117MI6 Agent
    Gala Brand wrote:
    Connery's portrayal is nothing else than faithful to Fleming's works, which makes him the best Bond ever to me (I guess many people share this opinion).

    This is simply untrue. Connery's Bond was physically and emotionally invulnerable.

    Fleming's Bond, on the other hand, was frequently injured physically and emotionally. He's rejected by Gala Brand and Tiffany Case, betrayed by Vesper and then when he meets the love of his life, she's murdered.

    He's injured at the end of Live and Let Die, hospitalized at the end of The Man with The Golden Gun, injured and suffering from amnesia at the end of You only Live Twice, and dead at the end of From Russia with Love.

    In the books, Bond is a nicotine addict, an alcoholic, a drug abuser, and frequently depressed.

    Connery's Bond is an interesting character but he's not Fleming's Bond.


    I'm afraid you didn't get my point. It is the second time it occurs (the first time was not with you) and I start to wonder if I'm not the one to blame eventually. Perhaps I'm not clear enough or my words are not the right ones to express my point of view. I apologize for it.

    To me, Sean Connery IS James Bond, and not only because he turns out to be the most charismatic and classy actor of the six who officially played the part. I put him just before Dalton who's a wonderful Bond - far better than Craig - tougher than Sean but with less charm.
    The main reason I think he portrays the character so well is because when I see him, I believe it.

    The various examples you take from some novels show Bond is human and knows what failure is. But is Connery responsible for the fact the situations he's involved in feature a man succeeding more often than he fails or gets injured ? I don't think so. It mainly depends on the screenwriters.
    If you pay attention, there are some rare moments when Bond's weaknesses are showed, and Connery's very convincing. In the first four films, he's not "physically invulnerable": he barely stands in his cell after his torture session in Dr No's repair, Red Grant almost kills him on the Orient-Express (look at his hands just after the fight), in Fort Knox, Oddjob hits him with such a power he can hardly breathe and get up, and Largo dominates him on the Disco Volante (he owes his life to Domino).

    "Emotionally invulnerable" as well ? I disagree. In GF, he's traumatized by Jill's death to the extent M points out his obsession with vengeance. In TB, when he reveals Derval's death to Domino, her sadness makes him quite upset and he hides his emotion behind sunglasses.

    Concerning the fact Bond is a nicotine addict and an alcoholic, I think it's difficult to show it in the movies as suggestively as it is described in the novels, and it's even more true for the drug abuser and the frequently depressed aspects. Nevertheless, his propensity to smoke, his huge knowledge of wine and spirits (claret, champagne, brandy, saké, sherry...) and his addiction to dry martini leave no room for doubt: Sean's Bond is more than a heavy smoker and drinker.

    When I say his portrayal of Bond is nothing else than faithful to Fleming's work, it is not supposed to be taken word for word. Of course there are differences between the novels and the movies but I just mean Connery doesn't changes the nature of the original character. When I think of the literary version of Bond, he couldn't be more credible to me, for many reasons. The fact Fleming himself was so impressed by his performance in Dr No he decided to give his heroe Scottish roots in the 1963 OHMSS novel proves it. If the creator felt betrayed by Connery's work, he wouldn't have done it.
  • Gala BrandGala Brand Posts: 1,147MI6 Agent
    Gala Brand wrote:
    Connery's portrayal is nothing else than faithful to Fleming's works, which makes him the best Bond ever to me (I guess many people share this opinion).

    This is simply untrue. Connery's Bond was physically and emotionally invulnerable.

    Fleming's Bond, on the other hand, was frequently injured physically and emotionally. He's rejected by Gala Brand and Tiffany Case, betrayed by Vesper and then when he meets the love of his life, she's murdered.

    He's injured at the end of Live and Let Die, hospitalized at the end of The Man with The Golden Gun, injured and suffering from amnesia at the end of You only Live Twice, and dead at the end of From Russia with Love.

    In the books, Bond is a nicotine addict, an alcoholic, a drug abuser, and frequently depressed.

    Connery's Bond is an interesting character but he's not Fleming's Bond.


    I'm afraid you didn't get my point. It is the second time it occurs (the first time was not with you) and I start to wonder if I'm not the one to blame eventually. Perhaps I'm not clear enough or my words are not the right ones to express my point of view. I apologize for it.

    To me, Sean Connery IS James Bond, and not only because he turns out to be the most charismatic and classy actor of the six who officially played the part. I put him just before Dalton who's a wonderful Bond - far better than Craig - tougher than Sean but with less charm.
    The main reason I think he portrays the character so well is because when I see him, I believe it.

    The various examples you take from some novels show Bond is human and knows what failure is. But is Connery responsible for the fact the situations he's involved in feature a man succeeding more often than he fails or gets injured ? I don't think so. It mainly depends on the screenwriters.
    If you pay attention, there are some rare moments when Bond's weaknesses are showed, and Connery's very convincing. In the first four films, he's not "physically invulnerable": he barely stands in his cell after his torture session in Dr No's repair, Red Grant almost kills him on the Orient-Express (look at his hands just after the fight), in Fort Knox, Oddjob hits him with such a power he can hardly breathe and get up, and Largo dominates him on the Disco Volante (he owes his life to Domino).

    "Emotionally invulnerable" as well ? I disagree. In GF, he's traumatized by Jill's death to the extent M points out his obsession with vengeance. In TB, when he reveals Derval's death to Domino, her sadness makes him quite upset and he hides his emotion behind sunglasses.

    Concerning the fact Bond is a nicotine addict and an alcoholic, I think it's difficult to show it in the movies as suggestively as it is described in the novels, and it's even more true for the drug abuser and the frequently depressed aspects. Nevertheless, his propensity to smoke, his huge knowledge of wine and spirits (claret, champagne, brandy, saké, sherry...) and his addiction to dry martini leave no room for doubt: Sean's Bond is more than a heavy smoker and drinker.

    When I say his portrayal of Bond is nothing else than faithful to Fleming's work, it is not supposed to be taken word for word. Of course there are differences between the novels and the movies but I just mean Connery doesn't changes the nature of the original character. When I think of the literary version of Bond, he couldn't be more credible to me, for many reasons. The fact Fleming himself was so impressed by his performance in Dr No he decided to give his heroe Scottish roots in the 1963 OHMSS novel proves it. If the creator felt betrayed by Connery's work, he wouldn't have done it.

    You're entitled to your opinions.
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