Last Bond movie you watched.

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  • GymkataGymkata Minnesota, USAPosts: 4,154MI6 Agent

    I'd love love love to see OHMSS on the big screen. Someday, perhaps.

    Current rankings (updated 12/21)
    OHMSS>FRWL>CR>TSWLM>NTTD>MR>SF>FYEO>GE>DN>YOLT>OP>
    TND>TWINE>QOS>TB>TMWTGG>GF>LALD>TLD>AVTAK>SP>DAF>LTK>DAD
    Bond rankings: Lazenby>Moore>Connery>Craig>Brosnan>Dalton
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent

    napster said:

    At last a comment!

    I know I meant to comment when you posted but musta got distracted. Your epic reviews always introduce lots of discussion points that deserve following up, and are even better because of your iconoclastic style, you make us think about our lazy assumptions.

    I'd love to see OHMSS not just on the big screen, but one of those educational IMAX screens that are intended to induce vertigo. I think the sense of landscape is stronger in this film than any other BondFilm, all those sheer icy drops.

    I'll have a proper read later. But one thing I wonder, are you taking notes while in the cinema? and how do you pay attention to the movie if youre taking notes?

  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,450Chief of Staff
    edited April 5

    Napoleon, re post 954- Draco's bridge partner and the one who tells Tracy about her father's plans are the same person, Olympe. She's voiced by the ubiquitous Nikki van der Zyl.

    Post 258- Donald Pleasence didn't have any Hammer credentials at that time.

  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 19,990MI6 Agent

    An insightful review as always, NP. I'm sure John Glenn would've realised (like you did) how much Tracy's death scene screams out for comic relief. A double-taking fox perhaps? I love OHMSS, we all do. But you have a point regarding the Bond girls. EON missed a trick by not hiring a Coke Zero-loving Norwegian to cast them. "Man with a hat" is actually an expression in these parts, refering to older gentlemen driving slowly in the middle of the road. Do we know if Lazenby started this trend?

  • chrisno1chrisno1 LondonPosts: 2,065MI6 Agent

    Love this review @Napoleon Plural oh how I wish you'd really got banned from the Prince Charles... 😃

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    'I know....!'

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    See, that's crazy to me, I've seen this film a fair few times and never realised they were the same! Again, this to me is a flaw in the writing or directing, the film doesn't quite link up. She doesn't quite look the same - does she have her hair up in the bridge scene? - and it's not referenced, is it? They could have Olympe return at the end of Bond and Draco's meeting on a pretext, have her say 'You could meet in a family setting, she's always more relaxed there' or at the bullfight, 'This is a bit more physical than bridge, wouldn't you say?' or just something to tie them together. Similarly, though Draco's men are physically distinctive, there are no tip offs to connect them to the guys who storm Blofeld's lair, we aren't invited to care or be interested in them much. Bond going berserk upon seeing the blond guy dangling from the mountain doesn't quite work because the two exchanged no 'moment' together, despite the safe-cracking scene.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • chrisno1chrisno1 LondonPosts: 2,065MI6 Agent

    I know there are a lot of women in OHMSS, so maybe your eyesight was, how shall we say, suffering. But I have to disagree. It is very obviously the same actress, the rather lovely Virginia North, who was a model, but also acted, featuring in the two Bulldog Drummond efforts as well as The Abominable Dr Phibes. We see her face on, so it shouldn't be difficult. I am really surprised you struggle with this. I have never considered them a different person in all the viewings. In fact, doesn't Draco use her name: "Olympe, a martini for our guest and a campari for myself." At the birthday party, Tracy then uses her name: "Tell me, Olympe, what has Papa planned for me."

  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,450Chief of Staff
    edited April 6

    Yes, both Draco and Tracy call her by name.

    The blond guy's name is Campbell, though he's never called that in the movie. Fleming gives his full name as Shaun Campbell but obviously that wasn't going into the film. He was played by Bernard Horsfall, who also appeared in other movies directed by Peter Hunt ("Gold","Shout At The Devil" both starring Roger Moore). He gets some dialogue with Bond and Blofeld in the novel though only with Blofeld in the movie while Bond looks on.

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    Well that scene with Draco is in long shot mostly it seems to me, another Hunt thing, it works better on the big screen because you can see the detail better. Do we see a close up of her face in that scene? I don't know. Bond would be better off going off with her and ditching wet blanket Tracy, he only winds up getting her killed. Does she reemerge with the drinks? I don't know.

    Not sure what my Kenneth Williams picture above alludes to I think I posted it late.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,450Chief of Staff

    I can't remember if she gets a close-up in that scene. Don't think so, since the emphasis is on Draco. "Draco" translates as "dragon", just like the real name of Hugo Drax (von der Drache), another example of Fleming's obsession with dragons (DN, YOLT, etc).

  • Shady TreeShady Tree London, UKPosts: 2,703MI6 Agent

    Ah, Olympe! When Tracy comments to Olympe that there are many things about Mister Bond that one doesn't know, Olympe replies, "It would be interesting to attend night school, perhaps." That line makes me cringe. Always having assumed that Olympe is Draco's girlfriend as well as assistant, and yet of a similar age to Tracy, I find it rather 'off' that she should be suggesting to Tracy that she consider a sexual relationship with Bond, a man both women clearly find attractive and to whom - as Olympe seems to know and as Tracy intuits - Draco would like to marry Tracy off. Excruciantingly 'Bouquet Of Barbed War' in terms of how much needs untangling, there!

    Critics and material I don't need. I haven't changed my act in 50 years.
  • CoolHandBondCoolHandBond Mactan IslandPosts: 4,763MI6 Agent

    @Shady Tree Olympe is encouraging Tracy to have a relationship with Bond by telling her what a catch he would be, just because a girl fancies a man doesn’t mean she will actually jump into bed with him, but fantasies do no harm. I’m sure many members on here, male and female, fancy other people, but whether they would actually carry out an affair would depend on their own moral compass.

    Yeah, well, sometimes nothin' can be a real cool hand.
  • CoolHandBondCoolHandBond Mactan IslandPosts: 4,763MI6 Agent

    @Napoleon Plural It’s been a long time since I saw OHMSS on the big screen and it’s my favourite Bond movie, so I disagree with a lot of what you wrote, but I enjoy reading other points of view, it would be boring if everyone thought the same.

    Yeah, well, sometimes nothin' can be a real cool hand.
  • Shady TreeShady Tree London, UKPosts: 2,703MI6 Agent
    edited April 7

    @CoolHandBond Yes, indeed; but my point about the admittedly briefly sketched Draco/ Olympe/ Tracy dynamic is more to do with its cringeworthy cross-generational Freudian implications (the Electra complex), intersecting with the notion of an arranged marriage - not to mention further intersections with 'maybe/ maybe-not' notions of sex as payment of debt, or of phallocentric domination as a solution to a woman's suicidal depression. Although OHMSS has been latterly feted as an accessibly human story, obviously tributed by Babs's revisionist NTTD, its sexual politics, particularly in its earlier passages, are murkier, seedier and arguably more messed up even than Connery-Bond's assertion in YOLT of his intention to retire to Japan as a joking response to Tanaka's blatantly off-handed sexism. I guess that's what came of making a dramatically serious-minded adaptation of Fleming.

    The scene in question somehow puts me in mind of the later, manifestly Freudian 'Bouquet of Barbed Wire', conjuring vague associations with Frank Finlay, Susan Penhaligon, Deborah Grant and James Aubrey.

    Critics and material I don't need. I haven't changed my act in 50 years.
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    See, that's where ignorance is bliss because I just didn't pick up on that woman being Draco's squeeze from earlier. As seen in the bullfighting venue, she's the only woman in the entire film who I find fanciable and it's a bit part. But with this new information it is a bit cringe.

    @CoolHandBond that was my more flattering review!

    Off to Google Bouquet of Barbed Wire...

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • Shady TreeShady Tree London, UKPosts: 2,703MI6 Agent
    edited April 7

    @Napoleon Plural It's only an assumption that Olympe is Draco's squeeze - but I see Draco as a similar type to Kerim Bey, a widower who had his Nadja Regin, so it's a reasonable assumption that Olympe is in that same kind of 'companion' role that Ms Regin played. Unless of course I just have a grubby mind and Olympe is nothing more than Tracy's friend - in which case it's simply a matter of a natter between girls and I take it all back!

    Agreed that it would have been good to have seen more of Virginia North!

    Critics and material I don't need. I haven't changed my act in 50 years.
  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent

    napoleon sez

    The actress who plays Irma Bunt is facially quite handsome, she could be Fiona Volpe’s mother, maybe she was if Spectre is all in the family. I don’t see why Bond couldn’t have got into bed with her, they both could have had a good time.

    Lookism. Theres a very narrow range of the Ideal of Beauty in these BondFilms and Irma is well outside it. Further she's a character from Fleming, and in Fleming Ugly = Evil.

    But he really should have made a move when he found her in the other lady's bed. Just like he successfully turned Pussy to the side of the angels and attempted the same with Fiona, he probably could have used his Mojo superpowers to turn Irma. Then he could have saved the world a few days earlier and Tracy would still be alive. But no, he'll only Do It with Hot Chicks even though his skills of seduction are part of his job (see mission briefing dialogs in FRWL and TND).

  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent
    edited April 7

    napoleon says

    The seasons might be out of whack. It’s suddenly Christmas in Switzerland but was it really winter during the scenes on the beach, or the bullfighting scene? This is different to the book of course, which began around September, an Indian summer in the south of France then naturally progressed to Christmas. It’s not clear in the film how long Bond spends on his studies at the College of Arms to get into character and it might break up the idea of his romance if it’s suggested that it’s been three months or so.

    yes the passage of time is clear in the book

    as you say he meets Tracy in September. in the book they meet in Royale les Eaux, which is northernmost coast of France, so summer ends there earlier than the Mediterranean. I think the film moves that scene to Portugal, where it could be later in the year. Later on in the book Bond arranges to visit Piz Gloria specifically on December 22nd, so all the Christmas trees and gift-giving in the film is accurate. He and Tracy marry on New Years Day, an impulse decision immediately acted on. They marry in the British Consulate in Munich, Draco is there but not M and the gang from the office. They really should have waited longer and travelled further from "that damned mountain" since Bond knew the big baddies had survived.

    anyway, the explicit date Bond meets Tracy may be ambiguous but the filmmakers do suggest a longer than usual passage of time with the romantic montage, a device not used in the other films to my recollection


    also, somewhere I think you mention the character of Shaun Campbell, I'm not finding that right now.

    We had a bit of discussion of his role in the film in the Pros and Cons thread. His part's a bit underwritten, as if there's scenes missing, and the filmmakers don't dare touch on his real significance to the plot: Bond must choose to let a colleague die rather than blow his own cover and risk the mission.


    in both cases, it helps to have read the book. This film follows the book so closely that when they skip a bit it must seem like a plot hole to someone who hasn't read the source material. But it should still work rather you know your Fleming or not, so these gaps are mistakes in storytelling. Much of the "iconoclastic" nature of your review is assessing the film on its own inherent terms, which we obsessives probably can't do so easily as we all have Fleming memorised and value this film precisely for its fidelity to Fleming. Similarly. newbie Bond fans typically don't like this film because it gets the Formula wrong, not just because of Lazenby. So is this a film that is only appreciated by those who have read the books?

  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent

    napoleon also sez:

    It’s a fool’s errand wondering how this film would have fared with Connery. For a start, everyone raised their game on this because it was Lazenby’s first, it needed to be a hit. Secondly, it wouldn’t have starred Telly or Rigg, as they were relatively big names to pull in audiences to compensate for Lazenby not being a star. Connery might well have been up against Brigitte Bardot, who instead starred with Connery in Shalako. I can’t see her having much personality. 

    certainly Rigg compensates for the lack of Connery. But she might have been cast anyway. Her predecessor Honor Blackman costarred with Connery. Her presence alone does "raise the game" as she's a much better actor than the typical BondGirl til that point, Blackman and maybe Luciana Paluzzi excepted. and important to get a competent actor for this part, as Bond has to fall in love with this character and mourn her death, If the actress was the typical bikini model requiring vocal overdubs, as seen in most of the first five films, the whole point of the story would have been missed. So even if Connery had been in the film, they might have required a better than usual actress.

    I do like her better in The Avengers though. Despite being written into extra scenes, she doesnt get so much to do as a typical episode of her own teevee show, so it seems a waste her having quit something so good just to make this film. She's also more likable in The Avengers, where she smiles and laughs constantly. Here she has a permafrown that gives way to unconvincing smile in that one scene at the ice rink. But thats good acting, her character's meant to be suicidally depressed. I gotta admit, til I saw The Avengers I always thought that permafrown was how Diana Rigg always looked.

  • caractacus pottscaractacus potts Orbital communicator, level 10Posts: 3,394MI6 Agent

    and furthermore napoleon sez:

    the dialogue ... where the concierge is talking about Bond’s ‘special requirements’, presumably his way with the women. The script probably called for the sort of thing we see at the Miami Beach Hotel in Goldfinger, or Nassau in Thunderball - obvious shots of bikini babes sashaying across from right to left, big ass on view, a staple of the Kennedy era, the time of Playboy magazine, but we don’t get that here as it might interrupt the flow of the day to night segue. I must say, we never see Oswald and his wife Martha trying to change behind a windbreaker in these shots, their kid whining about his dropped ice cream.

    It’s possible that Hunt missed an obvious trick here. But what worked in 64/65 might well not have done in 69 (you were expecting me) where feminism was on the rise and more than that, it all might have looked a bit dated by then. That not withstanding, it lends a high minded feel to the film, as we are made to concentrate on the main love interest Tracy and not what else he might be getting around the pool.

    this is a big point, could almost be a thread in itself: the evolution of the pool scenes/gratuitous eye candy scenes. They were definitely a recurring image not just in the earlier BondFilms, but take up huge chunks of running time in the Matt Helm and Derek Flint films as well. Even early episodes of the Avengers (which by definition preceded Goldfinger) in the episode Cathy Gale is introduced. Death Dispatch, Steed meets his boss beside a swimming pool surrounded by bikini babes and picks one up immediately after his boss is done briefing him (and in season 1's Tunnel of Fear Steed goes undercover with a carnival troupe of bellydancers, see screencap here). Contemporary to OHMSS Jason King was routinely picking up chicks on the beach in Department S.

    in OHMSS we do get something similar with the introduction of the Angels of Death. as soons they appear, there is a musical cue similar to whenever Ginger walked on stage in Gilligan's Island, and I'm sure everyone gets the idea Bond could have them all if he wanted to. So I think the lack of bikini babes during the first beach scene must be to support the deeper-than-usual attraction to Tracy, we only get that nudge nudge winkwink stuff once she's stepped out of the plot (then when they meet again she asks "what really went on, on top of that mountain", and he won't tell, it was all so traumatic)

    I don't think it was due to any contemporary rise in feminism. The next three Bond films we get plenty of silly girls in bikinis "showing a bit more cheek than usual", and the big pool party scenes begin in earnest with Moore's later movies (accompanied by current issues of Playboy promoting naked BondGirls from the latest film, who turn out to be models only had nonspeaking lines in that one brief pool scene, never a real actress with a speaking part). Even the otherwise sexless Dalton films have those gratuitous pool-party scenes.

    I didnt know Hunt was gay. That could explain the lesser objectification of women in OHMSS, but everyone's an individual so thats no predictable cause and effect. I mentioned earlier Jason King picking up babes in Department S, and Peter Wyngarde was also a gay man in real life. when watching that show I thought maybe that kind of brazen heterosexuality was a gay man's idea of how straight men behave

    so I do agree the change in attitude to women was needed to make plot work, and what's funny is how quickly Bond reverts to form as soon's Tracy's offstage and the Angels of Death enter. If Tracy had lived, theirs would have had to be a very "open" marriage.

  • Shady TreeShady Tree London, UKPosts: 2,703MI6 Agent

    @Napoleon Plural I've passed on these Prince Charles screenings so far because of concerns about Covid and memories of how cramped it can sometimes feel at that venue, but your excellent posts make me realise what I've been missing (even though I last saw most of the 60s-80s Bonds on the big screen about fifteen years ago in a season at the BFI Southbank). I'm tempted, this time, to come on board for the Brosnan films when the current season gets that far.

    Critics and material I don't need. I haven't changed my act in 50 years.
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    Yes and no. Was all set to see Golden Gun this afternoon - it's showing right now, as it happens, while After the Fox, the Peter Sellers film winding up on London Live Channel 8 as I type, suggests that Britt Eckland was no fool as a comic actress and misused in Bond. But I was tired and I checked out the booking on today's screening - just a few to many near the front where I sit so I cried off. Covid is a concern for me too, though it's possible the publicity on Twitter the Bond community has given to the films, not to mention my own posts on this thread, have made it more popular; it only takes 10 people to read it and think, hey, maybe I'll turn up near the front and that nixes is for me.

    Even with Casino Royale 67 there were a few booked in front row, probably for greater leg room.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,450Chief of Staff

    Maybe they just want a really good look at how much it's like NTTD? https://www.ajb007.co.uk/discussion/54920/spoilers-nttds-similarities-to-an-earlier-bond-film#latest

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    I hadn't read that post, Barbel - that's a good one! Copious rewrites too, some from a young recently acclaimed comedy writer.

    I wish CR 67 were just a bit better, zippier in the first half with none of that rubbish with Deborah Kerr in the bath, or Niven with the lisp. Of course, Sellers went AWOL. Odd that he puts in a decent enough turn in one-joke movie After the Fox, no sign of his breakdown there. Hard to remember or easy to forget his brilliance as Fred Kite in the superb and depressingly topical comedy I'm Alright Jack.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • BarbelBarbel ScotlandPosts: 33,450Chief of Staff

    Thanks, Napoleon. I'll incorporate your point about a young comedy writer, if that's okay.

  • CoolHandBondCoolHandBond Mactan IslandPosts: 4,763MI6 Agent

    Wow, far too in depth for me 😂 I’m not sure that Bond films need to be analysed so finely to be honest. And Tanaka’s view of life is still prevalent in many Asian countries today, must be the reason I love the Far East so much 😉

    Yeah, well, sometimes nothin' can be a real cool hand.
  • JB1106340JB1106340 Posts: 408MI6 Agent

    There’s likely a thread elsewhere for this (so apologies if I’m duplicating) but all the movies are currently being released in Cineworld, Vue and other cinemas across the country. Dr. No was last week (Jamaica looked incredible on the big screen) and From Russia With Love is on tonight and through next week. They’ll be on for the next 23 weeks in order!

  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent
    edited April 25

    Well, I got along to the Thursday showing of Moonraker at London’s Prince Charles cinema. It’s a fine experience sitting in the darkness and watching the night journey of the Moonraker shuttle… like old times at the movies. That said, this time round the movie didn’t really fly for me, a shame as it’s my second favourite Bond officially. There weren’t quite the same odd or quirky things I noticed to make an entertaining piece.

    There’s the spare wheel in the RAF jet liner who sits behind ice skater John Curry and Nicely Nicely, who gets to say nothing.

    If you’re going to spend a fortune making a brilliant freefall sequence, maybe pick a Jaws double who doesn’t look slight and Oriental, or if you have to go with that one, at least dye his hair so it’s not jet black. Maybe do something about the outlines of the square parachutes under their jackets in post-production. Thing is, I didn’t notice this when I was nine at the cinema on my two viewings, so why should it matter if I notice it now.

    Again, I’m not blown over by the so-called 4K presentation - is this meant to be better than BluRay? I can’t see it. I was blown away in my late teens getting the VHS remastered widescreen Bonds - the quality was superb. This isn’t bad but it’s not always great - M’s office tends to look a bit washed out, and the sound quality, well, Bassey’s voice doesn’t come in too loud. I know you can never go back but the only way you really could is with a time machine, if you want to see Moonraker how it should be, it would be the opening month of its release in 1979, with an analogue print showing John Barry’s score off at its very best. That seems impossible to recreate.

    Naturally, one wonders if you always want to see the film again, or rather experience your first viewing of it again - the packed cinema full of happy and pleased cinemagoers getting in to see the biggest film of the summer, and a James Bond film at that, your Mum taking you to see it, going off to the swimming baths in the next week to recreate the underwater tussle with the python like others might practice holding their breath after watching The Poisiden Adventure on telly. It reminds me of F Scott Fitzgerald’s quote: what you want is not the second [alcoholic] drink, but the first drink again.

    It’s not even the same as enjoying it on the telly at Christmas, with the family around and tinsel and wrapping paper, plus Yuletide fare.

    [To be continued...]

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
  • Napoleon PluralNapoleon Plural LondonPosts: 9,719MI6 Agent

    That said, Moonraker ultimately suffers from the same flaw as another actor’s fourth film - like Thunderball it’s a bit of a one-note movie. If you don’t buy into the plot, there’s not that much else going on. As I pointed out a few pages back when reviewing The Spy Who Loved Me, it has two plots going, the submarine hijack and then the main theme - the Cold War sexual tension between Bond and Triple X, likewise You Only Live Twice is about a hijacked space capsule but its theme is Bond and the Far East culture clash. Take the themes out and you might look at the film and think, this is a load of cobblers really. Moonraker is a load of cobblers, really.

    Sure, you have the sexual byplay between Bond and CIA agent Holly Goodhead, more outrageous and interesting back in the day than now, plus Jaws recurring throughout, but that’s not much of a theme.

    In the 4K presentation we get to see how old Roger Moore looks six years before fans began carping about it in A View to a Kill, he really looks quite jowly, the full 50-plus Sir Keir Starmer look but at least Sir Keir is now older and has better hair. It’s amazing how as a kid I thought Moore might be in his late 30s or early 40s but I guess so long as you looked younger than PM Jim Callaghan you were young back then.

    That said, as with another actor’s fourth movie, Die Another Day, our lead seems to get younger as the film goes on, losing weight and getting into shape. Perhaps the weight gain was a ruse to make the producers think the actor was serious about not returning to the role now they were out of contract, whereas if they were down the gym it might be obvious they hoped to come back and that might affect their fee.

    As Moore departs M’s office he seems so padded he might still be wearing the parachute under his jacket that we saw in the pre-credits.

    What makes it worse is that Moore’s approach with the ladies is really quite obnoxious in this, it made me squirm - the lads who always book the front row thought ahead this time, as they could don their Turkish slippers for such toe-curling scenes. His ‘seduction’ of Corrine Defour is a bit ropey (autocorrect) and I know we all laugh as per tradition re his ‘a woman!’ Response to Dr Goodhead but his whole manner is so oily and pleased with himself.

    This is Bond at peak narcissism - no male mentors, colleagues or underlings in the entire adventure, no Kerim Beys, no Felix Leiters, no Quarrels - it’s just him doing his own thing and succeeding, sort of Boris Johnson type stuff - everybody’s mate but he doesn’t have any mates, all the credit if it goes well… that said he does hand over a fair bit of it to Dr Goodhead re the whole shuttle thing, no pretence he’s a master of any of that so you could argue his character undergoes some kind of trajectory.

    When did Moore get rid of his mole? It’s there in this one. Perhaps he did it to make himself less identifiable to enemy agents. Or perhaps MI6 was ordered to eliminate all moles in the organisation. I suppose that reminds me of the awful running joke in Austin Powers: Goldmember.

    The ‘Did I?’ Joke at the Vaux Le Vicompte got the biggest laugh on the day - but were those real pheasants being shot, just for the movie? Makes a mockery of Bond’s distaste - though it’s one scene Moore would not have to feel bad about in terms of Bond’s attitude.

    "This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

    Roger Moore 1927-2017
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