Military Service

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  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 21,620MI6 Agent
    I think everyone who knows me also know I'm not involved in inteligence. :D
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    BondJasonBond006 I think i saw somewhere that the Switzerland soldier keep their rifles in their homes. Is this true?
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    Yes absolutely. We have to leave the army base in full uniform with the SIG550 assault rifle on our backs. Needless to say with all safety precautions.
    We only are allowed to dress in civilian clothing once we are at home.
    Same for returning to the base, uniform, weapon with us.
    We travel mostly by train and public transport. If you visit Switzerland you will see men in uniform "on the streets" travelling from point A to B.

    The rifle stays with us, at home, when we are not serving. Many are on Reserve and keep their weapons at home in that time.
    It's what a militia is about, at least in Switzerland. Troops can be mobilised within 48 hours to the borders or wherever needed, from their homes...and bases.
    Dalton Rulez™
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    This is what it looks like when I'm home or as in this case at my buddies place after we undressed when we get home for the weekend...if we get home for the weekend...

    full.jpg

    Never mind the Pussy :))
    Dalton Rulez™
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 21,620MI6 Agent
    This was the system for the Home Guard in Norway until about ten years ago. I think the advantages are a high level of readiness and the military feels like an integrated part of society. I find it a bit much that Switzerland has such a high level of readiness since they need it less than most countries. But whatever makes them happy.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    This was the system for the Home Guard in Norway until about ten years ago. I think the advantages are a high level of readiness and the military feels like an integrated part of society. I find it a bit much that Switzerland has such a high level of readiness since they need it less than most countries. But whatever makes them happy.

    It's really historically like that since such a long time. And the Swiss are not known to reform fast. We now can, voluntarily give back the SIG550 after service if we want to, but nobody does really.

    As for needing this high level of readiness. That may be debated yes, but honestly, neither Serbia, Turkey or even the Ukraine is very far away...the way things are going in the world, the Swiss are actually re-discovering their "love" for the Swiss Army.
    And as you said, soldiers/recruits are an integrated part in our daily life.

    I don't say Turkey will invade ;) but what if Europe fails at some point, what if another Balkan war emerges...the army is not only here for "war" by the way, this high level of readiness is responsible for the quick help with natural disasters too, of which we have a lot as the Alps are a part of our country.
    Dalton Rulez™
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    BondJasonBond006 this is very interesting information. I wander if you also carry ammunition? What would you be able to do if there was a terrorist attack like we have seen in France or England if you were coming to or from your depot or home? Are you able to shoot the terrorist? I think in these times your civilians might like to see their soldiers travel this way as you do because it is to assure them against the terrorist or the criminals?
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 21,620MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    This was the system for the Home Guard in Norway until about ten years ago. I think the advantages are a high level of readiness and the military feels like an integrated part of society. I find it a bit much that Switzerland has such a high level of readiness since they need it less than most countries. But whatever makes them happy.

    It's really historically like that since such a long time. And the Swiss are not known to reform fast. We now can, voluntarily give back the SIG550 after service if we want to, but nobody does really.

    As for needing this high level of readiness. That may be debated yes, but honestly, neither Serbia, Turkey or even the Ukraine is very far away...the way things are going in the world, the Swiss are actually re-discovering their "love" for the Swiss Army.
    And as you said, soldiers/recruits are an integrated part in our daily life.

    I don't say Turkey will invade ;) but what if Europe fails at some point, what if another Balkan war emerges...the army is not only here for "war" by the way, this high level of readiness is responsible for the quick help with natural disasters too, of which we have a lot as the Alps are a part of our country.

    But I doubt the countries between Switzerland and those conflict areas will fall in such a short time it makes such readiness neccesery. And assault rifles are ineffective in helping victims of an avalanche.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    Number24 wrote:
    This was the system for the Home Guard in Norway until about ten years ago. I think the advantages are a high level of readiness and the military feels like an integrated part of society. I find it a bit much that Switzerland has such a high level of readiness since they need it less than most countries. But whatever makes them happy.

    It's really historically like that since such a long time. And the Swiss are not known to reform fast. We now can, voluntarily give back the SIG550 after service if we want to, but nobody does really.

    As for needing this high level of readiness. That may be debated yes, but honestly, neither Serbia, Turkey or even the Ukraine is very far away...the way things are going in the world, the Swiss are actually re-discovering their "love" for the Swiss Army.
    And as you said, soldiers/recruits are an integrated part in our daily life.

    I don't say Turkey will invade ;) but what if Europe fails at some point, what if another Balkan war emerges...the army is not only here for "war" by the way, this high level of readiness is responsible for the quick help with natural disasters too, of which we have a lot as the Alps are a part of our country.

    But I doubt the countries between Switzerland and those conflict areas will fall in such a short time it makes such readiness neccesery. And assault rifles are ineffective in helping victims of an avalanche.

    We do more than shoot with an army rifle ;) We are trained in many things.
    Dalton Rulez™
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 21,620MI6 Agent
    I would think so. But my point was that having an assault rifle at home is no use if you're helping out after an avalance.
  • 00730073 COPPosts: 966MI6 Agent
    As it happens I got my promotion and I am a Lieutenant Colonel since September 1st, 2017.....

    Woohoo!!! Congrats on your JR Colonel! {[] {[]

    If it's ok with you I'll down a whisky for your health, now that you have obtained your place in the "snipers cross hairs"! There is no better cover for us junior ranks than a short colonel with a field command! :v

    How is it with the Swiss Army, how was the party? What kind of traditions do you have for the festivities in case of promotions?
    "I mean, she almost kills bond...with her ass."
    -Mr Arlington Beech
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 21,620MI6 Agent
    Congratualations, BJB006! Since you're now a Lieutenant Colonel and I think your unit is a company you must be one of the leading officers in the unit. 2nd in command or platoon commander, perhaps?
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    BondJasonBond006 I think I may have asked the questions that are not to be answered. I can understand this and would not answer myself. But I like to think that the soldier in Switzerland would make the civilians feel safe from crimes or the terrorist if he was travelling to his home or depot in uniform with his rifle. We could travel in uniform also while not on duty or going on leave but we would never carry rifles as they would be locked in the armoury at all times and to be signed for. We also could travel for free on the train and the bus. I wonder if the Swiss soldier can travel free if he is in uniform?
  • Bond44Bond44 Vauxhall CrossPosts: 1,581MI6 Agent
    0073 wrote:
    As it happens I got my promotion and I am a Lieutenant Colonel since September 1st, 2017.....

    Woohoo!!! Congrats on your JR Colonel! {[] {[]

    If it's ok with you I'll down a whisky for your health, now that you have obtained your place in the "snipers cross hairs"! There is no better cover for us junior ranks than a short colonel with a field command! :v

    How is it with the Swiss Army, how was the party? What kind of traditions do you have for the festivities in case of promotions?
    Congrats on the promotion BondJasonBond006 in our armed forces that would make you the Navy equivalent of a 'Commander!' More in common with Bond after all than you might think.

    Cheers :007)
    My name is Bond, Basildon Bond - I have letters after my name!
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    Thank you guys :007)

    @Joshua

    We travel for free in Switzerland. Also people have a lot of respect, when we board a full train, people will get up and let us sit because we are in full uniform and carry heavy baggage.

    The terrorism question indeed is something I cannot elaborate on, I am sorry.
    Dalton Rulez™
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    Number24 wrote:
    Congratualations, BJB006! Since you're now a Lieutenant Colonel and I think your unit is a company you must be one of the leading officers in the unit. 2nd in command or platoon commander, perhaps?


    I am commander of a battalion.
    Also I am a staff officer now, in one of the four big territorial forces and in a Brigade as well.
    In other words, I moved up quite a bit and I am working a lot. I am usually on 50 to 60 hours a week. That's not a complaint though, I love what I do.
    Dalton Rulez™
  • Greetings Joshua. Like Bond I was a Navy man, the U.S. Navy as a Corpsman, which for those who don't know is the Navy version of a medic. Served for 5 years. 2 of those in Bethesda, MD at the National Naval Medical Center where I deployed to the Persian Gulf on the U.S.N.H.S Comfort. On the way back home we stopped in Bahrain, Crete, Rota Spain and the Canary Islands. And 3 years spent attached to a U.S. Marine unit out of Kaneohe Hawaii with a combat deployment to Afghanistan. Also had training in Okinawa and had the chance to see Tokyo. Overall a great experience.
    Joshua wrote:
    Hello friends. I wondered if they're are any peoples here in AJB who used to be in the military of their country.
    I served for three years in the army of my country.
    Sorry but that last hand... Nearly killed me.
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    BondJasonBond006. After I asked this questions I relise that I would not be good to answer.

    Hello Agent Double-O Daniel. You saw many countries in your service.
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 SwitzerlandPosts: 870MI6 Agent
    I am not around much lately. The critical phase of training the para-scout recruits has begun. It's keeping me on my toes a good 18 hours a day. And then I try to get sleep :007)

    When I'm back I may get some pics into this thread. Things I can post without getting into trouble :D

    I have been that involved in field work last in 2011. I chose to do it again this year because I finally can see that my work defines me. I feel whole and I am really excellent as a soldier (officer) if I may say so. As a civilian I am not that great. Socially awkward and mostly not feeling too happy either. It's more complicated than these short sentences but just saying... :)

    Currently working in a co op mission with another country's army. We do that occasionally and it's always broadening my (our) horizons quite a bit and I (we) learn a lot from each other.
    Working with other armies in Europe is very important. Very glad and proud I am involved in this.

    Cheers, Jason
    Dalton Rulez™
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    I wish you luck BondJasonBond006. I know what you say. we can stand apart and proud as soldiers or ex soldiers.
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    A post by another AJB member about her ancestors military service record and a few secrets made me think of this secret from my army service. I never told anyone of this and would have got into much trouble, even being sent to DB if I had been caught.

    There was an NCO in my regiment who was very much disliked by all the soldiers. He was very arrogant and used to abuse his rank. All the soldiers hated him because he was a nasty character and a coward who would not have said anything to anyone if he had been just a private. But because he was the sergeant he thought he could hide behind his rank to abuse and bully the soldiers. He often got drunk and would come into the barrack to beat somebody. Everyone I knew would have fought him in a fist fight and I also would have been happy to do this but to beat him up would have put the soldier in great trouble. He kicked me once but never really picked on me because I am sure he knew I would have beaten him with out care for what happened, but he picked on many of my friends. I thought of a good way to get revenge on this NCO. One night I broke into his room while he was not there and stole his trousers. I swapped them with some trousers which I had brought with me. I had taken these trousers and rubbed the inside on a plant called the Huriri plant all in the legs and especially around the area of the private parts. I was very careful to handle these trousers. I burned his trousers in the boiler to get rid of them. The Huriri plant has hairs which when they touch the skin cause extreme pain by itching and burning. There is no way really to get the hairs off. The next morning the NCO was not on duty. He had put the trousers on and was immediately in great pain! He was sent to hospital for treatment and had to stay in. He was in much pain. Everyone laughed about this and there was even an investigation when it was realised that some one had sabotaged his trousers! No body ever knew it was me that was the cause of his pain!
  • Dirty PunkerDirty Punker ...Your Eyes Only, darling."Posts: 2,587MI6 Agent
    "It was all me NCO. The author of all ye pain."
    :D
    Great story, Joshua.
    a reasonable rate of return
  • Bond44Bond44 Vauxhall CrossPosts: 1,581MI6 Agent
    I remember sharing a multi occupancy room where I was the junior and a senior had his own room at the end of the billet. Every night would go out for drinks while we were grounded in camp. After a few days he had paired with a rather nice young lady who happened to be the landlords daughter. Anyway after about a week of hearing them tip toe through our room to his and then having sex I had become bored with it. I noticed her routine was to use the toilet once they had finished so one night I put black boot polish all over the toilet seat and cling film over the pan. Unfortunately for her that night she did a complete unload and there was mess everywhere! Needless to say her screams and his laughs could be heard all over camp. Never saw her again and he moved out within 24hrs! Karma was restored :D

    Cheers :007)
    My name is Bond, Basildon Bond - I have letters after my name!
  • Asp9mmAsp9mm Over the Hills and Far Away.Posts: 7,475MI6 Agent
    Bond44 wrote:
    I remember sharing a multi occupancy room where I was the junior and a senior had his own room at the end of the billet. Every night would go out for drinks while we were grounded in camp. After a few days he had paired with a rather nice young lady who happened to be the landlords daughter. Anyway after about a week of hearing them tip toe through our room to his and then having sex I had become bored with it. I noticed her routine was to use the toilet once they had finished so one night I put black boot polish all over the toilet seat and cling film over the pan. Unfortunately for her that night she did a complete unload and there was mess everywhere! Needless to say her screams and his laughs could be heard all over camp. Never saw her again and he moved out within 24hrs! Karma was restored :D

    Cheers :007)

    Heard that story many times. Urban/Mil legend or are you the original source? Cos, that'd be damned epic.
    ..................Asp9mmSIG-1-2.jpg...............
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    Also very much against regulations but not as serious. In my army you could be in trouble if your feet were not kept in good condition. I cannot remember anybody being charged with this but some times we would have our feet inspected to make sure they were kept well. This was only very rare though. When I was on exercise in the bush most times I used to take my boots off and tie them on my back pack. I always walked in the bush without shoes so my feet were then very hard and even still are. I always felt better not to wear boots. I could only do this when I was not with someone senior. Even going over very hard ground and country I never had any injury because this is how I was from being a young boy. No one else I knew did this. I think there must have been some other soldiers who were like me though and brought up in the bush and had no need to wear boots.
  • Bond44Bond44 Vauxhall CrossPosts: 1,581MI6 Agent
    edited December 2017
    Asp9mm wrote:
    Bond44 wrote:
    I remember sharing a multi occupancy room where I was the junior and a senior had his own room at the end of the billet. Every night would go out for drinks while we were grounded in camp. After a few days he had paired with a rather nice young lady who happened to be the landlords daughter. Anyway after about a week of hearing them tip toe through our room to his and then having sex I had become bored with it. I noticed her routine was to use the toilet once they had finished so one night I put black boot polish all over the toilet seat and cling film over the pan. Unfortunately for her that night she did a complete unload and there was mess everywhere! Needless to say her screams and his laughs could be heard all over camp. Never saw her again and he moved out within 24hrs! Karma was restored :D

    Cheers :007)

    Heard that story many times. Urban/Mil legend or are you the original source? Cos, that'd be damned epic.
    Oh it’s genuine as you say back in the day (80’s) it was an urban myth I am sure copied many times where do you think we got the idea from? As young soldiers we were not that bright to work it out ourselves, best we had come up with at that point was toothpasting private parts and giving the afore mentioned candidate ralgex to wash it off with as a supposed cure for the burning sensation! (Tip anyone who has ever tried Veet for men in the same place will know what I mean! - if not read buyers reviews on Amazon they are a blast before you try as I know someone will now be curious to see if they are man enough)

    To be fair I never thought we would pull it off but fortunately for us her trip was always in the dark and they had been for a ruby which may have loosened things up. Some years later I later promoted to be a SNCO and became friends with the then Cpl (now Sgt Maj) involved, fortunately he saw the funny side when I confessed one night at the bar.

    Soldiers and bordem or revenge never a good mix. :D

    One day I will write my memoirs soldiers do the strangest of things! Some best left where they happen of course.

    Cheers :007)
    My name is Bond, Basildon Bond - I have letters after my name!
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 1,138MI6 Agent
    Bond44 wrote:
    .

    Soldiers and bordem or revenge never a good mix. :D

    I remember another time, but I was not involved in this. Our forward training base was deep in the bush and far away from any proper roads. Only dirt track and some strip roads. One NCO was not liked. The NCO was going from camp in his car to go home on leave and he got a couple of miles perhaps into the bush on the dirt track and his car wheels fell off. There was much fuss made by the Regiment at this incident when it was known that all his car wheels had been loosened so they would fall off. Two of the wheels had fallen off and the other two were almost off. The NCO was most displeased. The military police was called for but they could not find the guilty men. I did not know who they were but we all had a very good laugh at the NCOs trouble.
  • Andi1996Andi1996 ZürichPosts: 50MI6 Agent
    edited February 2018
    Well, this is great. I'm so pleased -{ -{

    I'm a Corporal in the Swiss army. I belong to the 17th, that's the para-scouts. It's Special Forces and it's more than a job, it's for life.

    We're not supposed to get pictures out on the internet, so I can't just randomly post stuff.

    @Joshua I find you particularly interesting if you allow me to say this.
    "It's always a pleasure to welcome someone with a mutual interest."
  • DrydenDryden UKPosts: 131MI6 Agent
    Seven years in the Army Reserve for me, mostly spent in the UK with one six month tour of Afghanistan towards the end.

    IMG_2372.jpg
  • Number24Number24 NorwayPosts: 21,620MI6 Agent
    Rank, service and role?
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